Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Your Fantastic Elastic Brain: Stretch It, Shape It

Deak, JoAnn (Author)
Ackerley, Sarah (Illustrator)
Little Pickle Press 2010. 32 pages
First published: 2010
ISBN: 9780982993804 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 612.8
Book type: Non-Fiction

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This dynamic and highly accessible introduction to the wonders of the brain is a great resource for younger readers with its sparse and informative text and colourful illustrations.

The direct, conversational tone encourages readers to think of the brain as malleable, “Like elastic bands that S-T-R-E-T-C-H when you pull them.” The message is a good one: practice makes perfect, and making mistakes helps the brain grow. Anatomical explanations of the functions of the brain are described in easy-to-digest language. A tiny mouse and an owl are comical commentators along the way.

The layout of information is incredibly vibrant with cartoon diagrams, pull down charts, speech bubbles and more. Brain-active children can be seen playing sports, learning an instrument, dreaming of aliens and testing magic tricks. Different fonts and colours highlight keywords and keep the learning lively.

Big concepts are made comprehensible in this marvellous book that empowers readers to take charge of their learning and the shaping and sculpting of their brain. There’s enough material here to spread out over several lessons on this amazing organ: what it is, what it can do and how to use it.

  •  What do you know about the brain? Start a class anchor chart. Add new information as you read.
  •  Look at the picture of the girl on page four. Discuss all the things her brain does. What things does your brain do that make you you? Create a similar illustration of yourself.
  •  What new skill would you like to learn? Make a graphic organizer showing how the parts of your brain will help you achieve this goal.
  •  Brainstorm what you already know about the brain. Start an anchor chart. Add any new information as the book is read.
  •  As your day goes on, take note on a brain map of the parts of the brain you are using as you participate in different activities.
  •  

    Draw a mind map of what you learned about your brain. Add information that relates to yourself (e.g. My amygdalae help me be happy when I play with my friends, and sad when I’m sick and have to cancel plans – which I made with my prefrontal cortex).

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Physical Education and Health
  • Science and Technology