Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Young Frank, Architect

Viva, Frank (Author/Illustrator)
Abrams 2013. 36 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780870708930 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A little boy named Frank lives with his architect grandfather, also named Frank. Young Frank emulates his grandfather and builds things around the apartment. When he begins to go off in his own direction, making chairs out of toilet paper rolls and skyscrapers out of books, his grandfather insists that this type of design is not architecture. A trip to the Museum of Modern Art reveals to both that architecture is more than buildings and is an art form of its own that invites creativity and innovation.

The story celebrates the sharing of knowledge and experiences between generations and the need to respect old and new ideas. Young Frank and Old Frank both have big dark-rimmed glasses and similar clothes—Young Frank is clearly influenced by his grandfather. His designs, however, show how he is beginning to develop his own identity.

Illustrations are in shades of blue and orange, and black and white, making the geometric shapes in the backgrounds pop. Strong quadrant lines throughout look as if they were drawn in chalk, and show the tools and vision of architects.

At the museum, Frank and his grandfather see designs by famed architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Frank O. Gehry. An endnote includes short biographies of these two and other architects. The story invites readers to think about how the materials around them can be used to build new objects and create new forms.

  •  Brainstorm what you think architects do. After some discussion, ask: Is their work entirely focused on designing buildings?
  •  

    Young Frank uses what he has to create potentially useful structures. Through drawing or with actual found objects, create structures that have a functional purpose. Write a short caption to present yourself (the architect), the materials you used and an explanation of your creation.

  •  

    Create an exhibition with your productions. Write invitation cards for other classes or parents to attend.

  •  

    Brainstorm and discuss what you think architects do. Note your ideas on a class chart.

  •  

    Examine the cover and endpapers. Go for a picture walk and discuss the visuals.

  •  

    With a partner, in school or at home, work on creating something architectural. Take photos as you work, for later discussion in English class. Write a short caption to present the artist (you), the material used and an explanation of your creation.

  •  

    Create an exhibition with your productions. Write invitation cards for other classes or parents to attend.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To cooperate with others
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Science and Technology
  • Visual Arts