Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Wolf Island

Godkin, Celia (Author/Illustrator)
Fitzhenry & Whiteside 2006. 32 pages
First published: 1989
ISBN: 9781554550081 (paperback)
9781554550074 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

point of view, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“Once there was an island.” Plain language conveys the interdependence of life in this eco-system: “Some animals ate grass . . . some ate other animals . . . there was plenty of food for all.” When the wolf family accidentally floats off the island on an old raft, they are ‘stranded’ on the mainland—and the island loses an important link in its food web.

Detailed illustrations in soft coloured-pencil effects lovingly render the passage of seasons on the island. The russet shades of fall are seen from high above, as a flock of Canada geese flies by. Readers may identify animals in the winter scene: deer, a lurking fox, round-bellied mice. Summer and the subsequent fall are not so pretty, as flourishing deer starve out the rabbits, which in turn deprive the foxes. The island looks bare, stripped of vegetation.

A cold winter’s ice bridge allows a return to the island. It is testimony to this book’s effective storytelling that the predatory image of an advancing wolf pack inspires relief. “Grass and trees would grow again. . . . There would be food for foxes and owls. . . . Life on the island was back in balance.”

  •  Examine the illustration of the island on the title page. List all the animals that call the island home.
  •  

    Draw the food chain of Wolf Island. Discuss how the departure of the wolves affects other living things in the ecosystem.

  •  

    Research natural habitats in your area that are fragile. Design a poster to raise awareness of how one of these areas can be protected.

  •  Tell the story from the point of view of one of the animals of Wolf Island.
  •  

    Discuss how the wolves moving to the mainland impacted the food chain. What about when they returned to the island?

  •  Make a timeline of the Wolf Island story.
  •  

    Discuss other elements that can impact a natural environment like Wolf Island.

  •  Discuss how you are part of a food chain. Draw a mind map of this chain.
  •  

    Research natural habitats in your area that are fragile. Design a poster to raise awareness of how one of these areas can be protected.

  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology