Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Winter Is for Snow

Neubecker, Robert (Author/Illustrator)
Disney/Hyperion Books 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781423178316 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

figurative language, point of view, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Winter is for sledding, skating, building snowmen and so much more. At least that’s what one enthusiastic boy thinks as he and his skeptical sister argue about the pros and cons of winter. Initially, she prefers TV and her electronic gadgets, but once she cottons on to the idea, the pair frolic in a winter wonderland before returning to the cozy warmth of the family home.

The rhyming back-and-forth dialogue between the siblings is filled with imagery that calls to mind a magical time of year: “Winter is for fat snowflakes,/swirling as they blow,/glittering like diamond dust!/Winter is for snow.”

The text is clearly and effectively supported by charming, cartoonish illustrations depicting the bustle and fun of the season for everyone. People shovel, ski, toboggan and have a jolly good time. The brother and sister’s words appear in different coloured fonts (blue for the boy, orange for the girl) to reflect their opposing viewpoints, though the sister gets the final celebratory words.

This lively ode to snow and winter is a good seasonal read-aloud that lends itself to choral reading.

  •  

    What do you notice about the illustration at the beginning of nine windows? What might be its significance? Revisit your inferences and predictions as you read and gather more information.

  •  

    Role play either the boy or the girl in the story and read the text aloud in pairs or groups.

  •  

    Are you more likely to agree with the girl or the boy in the story? Write about your preferences and the connections you have with the characters in the story.

  •  

    What if the story were set in summer? Work together to write a story called Summer is for ____.

  •  

    Role play either the boy or the girl and read the text aloud, in pairs or groups. Discuss how and why people like or dislike winter.

  •  

    Make a class list of winter words from the text. Find a way to organize them into categories. Create an illustrated winter vocabulary anchor chart.

  •  

    Look at a variety of fiction and non-fiction books on snow to add to your list. Discuss ways to sort the words in a mind map or graphic organizer.

  •  

    Are you more likely to agree with the girl or the boy in the story? Write about your preferences and the connections you have with the characters in the story.

  •  

    Using winter words from the chart, write poetry in the same style starting with Winter is for____.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • Health and Well-Being