Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Wild Ideas

Kelsey, Elin (Author)
Kim, Soyeon (Illustrator)
Owlkids 2015. 32 pages
First published: 2015
ISBN: 9781771470629 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 591.5
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

point of view, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A problem can be a creative opportunity, as this picture book suggests, using real examples from animal behaviours: “If squirrels can learn to cross roads by watching people, what can you learn by watching squirrels?” Poetic language and rich vocabulary make this a fine book for reading aloud: “Pigeons procrastinate. Bees calculate. Elephants innovate.”

Illustrations use collage techniques to create lavishly textured, dream-like scenes of children and animals solving problems together, such as forming simple tools and making traps and camouflage. One spread shows a family of orcas swimming with children in a hazy, pink sea. Aquatic plants provide a landscape for a baboon carrying its baby and a human child: “Killer whales rely on their mothers’ wisdom. Baboons get guidance from their dads.” Another scene depicts a golden grassland, where children ride ravens and hyenas: “Ravens use gestures to offer ideas. Hyenas cooperate to help the hunt.” Readers may be inspired to do further research, or propose more examples of creative problem-solving.

In both language and image, the values of experimentation, persistence and a positive attitude are vividly conveyed: “Problems that need solving will always be part of life. Untame your imagination.”

  •  

    Read the author’s note: “What can you learn by watching squirrels?” Take your reader-writer’s notebook to the park, go online or turn on the television and observe an animal closely. What can we learn from watching animals?

  •  

    “Lots of problems require you to hold tight ... Sometimes you need to leap.” Think of situations when you were better off waiting before doing something, and others when you just had to jump in and get started. Write in your reader-writer’s notebook about holding tight versus leaping, and how the two feel different.

  •  

    “You turn to friends and family for support.” Describe a time when you relied on family or friends to get something done. How did it feel? What does this tell you about the importance of showing support for others?

  •  

    Listen to podcasts, read texts and watch videos about how animals solve problems. Make a poster about one idea that fascinates you.

  •  

    Discuss the meaning of a wild idea. Where do such ideas come from?

  •  Go for a picture walk. Observe and discuss the settings and characters. Discuss the artist’s choice of materials and techniques.
  •  

    Listen to the text read aloud. Notice how it makes you think of different ideas. Note them in your reader-writer’s notebook.

  •  

    Listen to podcasts, read texts and watch videos on the book’s website to learn more about how animals solve problems. Make a poster about an idea that fascinates you.

  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Science and Technology