Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Which Is Round? Which Is Bigger?

Mamada, Mineko (Author/Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2013. 24 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781554539734 (hardcover)
Original language: Japanese
Dewey: 516
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

point of view, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This entertaining concept book invites children to examine kid-appropriate pairs of things (a duck and a peacock, a dog and a snail), and then determine which of the two possesses a particular attribute. Initially, the answer is obvious, but an unexpected visual twist prompts readers to re-examine their choice. The first pairing of a red apple and an armadillo asks the question “Which is round?” Turning the page, readers find the apple, no longer round, has been eaten down to its core while the armadillo has rolled itself up into a ball. The question is then repeated, with a follow-up that requires observational and critical thinking skills: “Which one is round? What do you think?”

Playful, uncluttered illustrations and a simple, repetitive structure teach six important concepts in this read-aloud that encourages children to think outside the box and reminds them that things may not always be what they seem at first glance.

  •  

    Discuss the pairs in the text. After establishing the pattern, stop and make predictions before turning each page.

  •  

    As a class, brainstorm additional “Which is . . . ?” pairs to add to the book. Make a big book with your ideas.

  •  

    How do the illustrations foster anticipation? How does your perspective/understanding of the questions change with each illustration?

  •  

    Discuss the pairs in the text. Discuss any new words. After establishing the pattern, stop and make predictions before turning each page.

  •  

    As a class, brainstorm additional “Which is . . .?” pairs. Write the new questions on a chart and add appropriate illustrations. Practise the new questions.

  •  

    Create a big book page with a new idea. Practise asking the question with your partner in an inside-outside circle. 

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Mathematics
  • Visual Arts