Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

What Is a Herbivore?

Kalman, Bobbie (Author)
Crabtree 2008. 32 pages
First published: 2008
Series: Big Science Ideas
ISBN: 9780778732952 (paperback)
9780778732754 (hardcover)
9781427182555 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 591.5
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Part of the Big Science Ideas series, this simple book on herbivores provides some fascinating information about the varieties of plant eaters that exist in the animal world. Pandas, hummingbirds, koalas, horses, termites and beavers are among the featured animals and insects that eat leaves, grasses, bark, fruit, nectar and pollen. Even ocean dwelling animals like dugongs and manatees are classified as grazers, as they eat sea plants. The concepts of a food chain and getting energy from the sun are also explored.

With catchy text headings like “Hard to eat leaves!” “Picky leaf eaters” and “It’s fruit for me,” the writing uses short sentences and straightforward language. Scientific information is conveyed with a direct tone: “Pollen is a yellow powder found in flowers. All bees and some wasps eat pollen. Butterflies, beetles, and flies eat some pollen, too, but they mainly feed on nectar.”

Large colour photographs and illustrations, along with plenty of white space, makes the reading easily accessible and the layout visually appealing. Italicized text under images gives further information: “The crossbill has a special beak that can take out the seeds from pine cones.”

Herbivore facts at the back include a guessing game with complex words like “frugivore” and “palynivore.” A table of contents, glossary and index are also included.

  •  

    Brainstorm what you know about herbivores. Use a class RAN chart (Reading and Analyzing Non-fiction texts) to note learning and wonderings. As the book is read, adjust the information.

  •  

    Read the table of contents and the glossary. Discuss how they can help you understand the information in the book.

  •  

    What can you learn about yourself by studying the lives of these animals and insects? What do you have in common and how are you different?

  •  

    This author has written numerous non-fiction texts about animals and their habitats, lifestyles and diets. Discuss why an author would choose this type of writing as the focus of their profession.

  •  

    Brainstorm what you know about herbivores and start a class chart of your knowledge. As the book is read, adjust the information.

  •  Read the content page and the glossary. Discuss how it will help you understand the information in the book.
  •  

    Create a mind map to help you understand and remember new facts and ideas.

  •  

    Create a graphic organizer showing how you are a herbivore based on what you eat.

  •  

    With a partner, discuss and list the types of plant foods you believe herbivores consume. After reading, check the validity of your answers.

  •  

    Are there any herbivores that are not featured in the book? Use resources to confirm your guesses.

  •  

    Create and present an informative poster on the seven types of herbivores found in nature. Include both text and images.

  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Physical Education and Health
  • Science and Technology