Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

What Does It Mean to Be Global?

DiOrio, Rana (Author)
Hill, Chris (Illustrator)
Little Pickle Press 2009. 32 pages
First published: 2009
ISBN: 9780984080601 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 179
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Using brief phrases and appealing images, this book introduces young readers to the concept of a global mindset: “Does it mean studying planets? No. Does it mean being round? No!”

Subsequent spreads define different aspects of global thinking, such as awareness (“experiencing other traditions”), respect (“different values”) and empathy (“your actions affect another person”).

Sweet line drawings mix childlike artistry with a cartoon-doodle sensibility to create fun, colourful drawings of children demonstrating global thinking. Young readers may wish to find the recurring characters among the spreads. One image shows the boy bowing to someone dressed in a kimono and obi. Another shows the girl operating a lemonade stand to raise money, while the boy helps build a home. His t-shirt reads: “Give back!”

The final spread depicts a world map, with the two characters located at various points of interest around the continents—emphasizing the benefits of being a global citizen. Back material includes biographies of the author and illustrator.

  •  Create a graph that denotes the different cultures and languages spoken by the students in your class. On a map, learn where your peers’ parents, grandparents or ancestors came from. 
  •  Become pen pals with students from another country. Learn about their culture and how they live. What do you have in common? Why is it important to learn about human diversity? 
  •  

    Discuss the meaning of opening your mind to new possibilities. Brainstorm some ways that you can “Give Back!” either locally or globally. 

  •  

    List the actions you have taken to date that show you are a global citizen. What other actions can you take, both on your own and as a class? Present your actions in a poster format entitled Global Citizens.

  •  Read along and talk about what the children are doing in the pictures. Do the illustrations and context help you understand new words? Are some words the same in French?
  •  

    Add another page to the book. Illustrate and write about doing something to show what global is: “Being global means . . . .”

  •  Make a poster that describes an aspect of your cultural background. Explain and display the posters in your classroom. 
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Geography, History and Citizenship