Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

What Do You Do With an Idea?

Yamada, Kobi (Author)
Besom, Mae (Illustrator)
Compendium 2013. 36 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781938298073 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, dialogue, point of view

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A young child, either a boy or a girl, has an idea. Depicted as an egg with a crown and legs, the idea is a thing of colour that bounds around a mostly black-and-white landscape. The story follows the pair through many stages of creation: inception, denial, mutual nurturing, doubt and renewed dedication.

“I tried to act like everything was the same as it was before my idea showed up,” the child says, touching on creativity’s transformative power. Though perhaps daunting, the idea is a source of happiness and renewed perspective. “It is good to have the ability to see things differently,” the idea tells the child.

The inspiring message is brought to life by beautiful artwork. With plenty of surrounding white space, pencil and watercolour illustrations become increasingly colourful as the child nurtures the idea. Rich depictions of nature make a whimsical world that spins and turns upside down under the idea’s influence.

Finally the child’s idea flows out into the world, a force for change. And what’s that nestled in the foliage on the last page? A sprinkling of small crowned eggs – more ideas await the child. Readers will finish the story convinced of the power of an idea, feeling more ready to believe in themselves.

  •  

    Examine the cover and read the book description on the back. Discuss the different kinds of ideas listed. What are some of the most important ideas people have had in these areas?

  •  Notice and discuss the use of colour in the illustrations. What do you think the illustrator is trying to convey?
  •  

    Make a list of problems that exist either at your school, in your community, in your country or in the world. Brainstorm as many ideas as you can to solve these problems. Discuss what steps you could take to follow through on an idea.

  •  

    Examine the cover and endpapers. Discuss the title. In small groups, discuss what you do when you have an idea. With the whole group, create a class list of what to do with an idea.

  •  

    As the book is read aloud, discuss how the character reacts to his idea. In small groups, draw a mind map of the character’s reactions. Compare your mind map to the stages of creation (see book description). Can you think of other ways to work with an idea?

  •  

    Go back to the class list to sort the various elements according to the different stages of creation. Analyze your ideas. Did you focus on certain steps more than others? Discuss why this might be.

  •  

    Explore companion books about people who have brought their ideas to life. How did they go through the various stages of creation?

  •  

    Think of one of your ideas. In your reading log, write about the steps you went through to develop it.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Personal and Career Planning