Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Weird Frogs

Earley, Chris (Author)
Firefly Books 2014. 64 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9781770854420 (hardcover)
9781770853614 (paperback)
9781770856516 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 597.8
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Fun and conversational language creates information-rich captions for stunning, close-cropped photos of some 50-odd frogs in this striking, non-fiction picture book.

The jewel-like colours and fine detail of the images invite reader browsing, while captions offer common and scientific names for each creature, along with their unique behaviours, attributes and life cycle information—such as with the pointy-nosed “DARWIN’S FROG Rhinoderma darwinii”: “When the embryos in the eggs start to move, the male frog gobbles them up and keeps them safe in his vocal sac … froglets then crawl out of the eggs into their dad’s mouth and jump out when he opens up.”

The animals’ great variety of form, pattern and colour make each spread a visual feast. One photo stretches across two pages as a “RED-EYED LEAF FROG Agalychnis callidryas” creeps along a branch, displaying its swirly patterned underside of bright white and royal blue, topped with an acid-green head that boasts red eyelids. In another image, the grim stare of a ghostly looking “GOLDEN POISON DART FROG Phyllobates terribilis” seems directed at the viewer: “This frog may be the most poisonous animal on the planet.”

An engaging introduction discusses the inspiration for the book and the need for ecological conservation. An index offers quick access to information about every frog depicted.

  •  

    Brainstorm and list some questions you could ask about frogs.

  •  

    List the structures and features of text in Weird Frogs and compare them to those of another non-fiction text such as Ocean and Sea by Steve Parker. How are they similar and different? Write to argue/explain why one text is more appealing than the other.

  •  

    Choose a favourite frog and do more research. What are its habitat, predators and prey? Make a poster to highlight your new learning.

  •  Brainstorm what you know about frogs. Start filling out a RAN or KWL chart. Add to it as you find new information.
  •  

    Notice the variety of frog skin patterns. Learn words to describe them (plain, bumpy, camouflage, spotted, etc.).

  •  

    Research which frog populations live in your area. What is being done, if anything, to protect them? Create an extension to this book with your local species.

  •  

    The author claims that frog populations have declined. Prior to reading, posit some reasons for this decline. Share your findings and discuss them.

  •  

    In pairs, select a frog from the book and write a Who am I? riddle. Take turns guessing each other’s riddles.

  •  

    In small teams, identify children’s stories and advertisements for goods or services which have used a frog as a character or marketing tool. Discuss why frogs might have been chosen.

  •  

    Research a frog found in Québec. Gather information and do an oral presentation on its physical characteristics, behaviour, habitat, predators and prey. Create three questions to check on your peers’ understanding. Validate or correct their answers.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology