Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

We Are All Born Free: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures

Sís, Peter (Illustrator)
Quarto 2008. 64 pages
First published: 2008
ISBN: 9781845076504 (hardcover)
9781847806635 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 341
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Award

USBBY Outstanding International Books List – 2009

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

In the aftermath of World War II, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted to ensure that the horrors of the war would never be repeated. The declaration includes 30 articles that define the inviolable freedoms and liberties of each person. This book makes this important document relatable to children. It provides a simplified version of the declaration, and each article is brought to life by an illustrator who provides his/her own interpretation of the article so that children can understand its significance.

The illustrations are varied and range from cartoon-like images to collage art and paintings in watercolours. Some of the illustrations are quite literal in interpretation while others take a more figurative approach, but in all cases they render the formal tone of the language of the declaration understandable. The book provides several opportunities for discussion about human rights and abuses of these in different parts of the world, as well as notions of democracy and citizenship.

The book, which was produced in collaboration with Amnesty International, includes forewords by actor David Tennant and children’s author John Boyne. It also includes a short profile of each illustrator who contributed to the book.

  •  

    Choose a human right and explain why it is important to you. With a partner, discuss how the words and images make you feel.

  •  

    Using magazine images, create a collage representing one of the rights.

  •  

    Write a response to the question: How can I make a difference in the world?

  •  

    Read the mini biographies at the end of the book. Choose an artist and research more about his/her life. Share your findings with the class.

  •  

    Create a list of the different organizations that defend humanity and human rights. Discuss the importance and impact of these organizations.

  •  

    Discuss which rights affect your daily life at home and at school in Canada. Are your rights respected? Explain. Which rights do you think are not respected in the world today?

  •  

    Choose one of the rights and explain how the illustration is a good representation of this right. Use resources to find the meaning of new words. Share with the class.

  •  

    Create your own representation of one of the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Make a display for your classroom or school.

  •  

    Research an organization that works for children’s rights to find out what your class can do to help (e.g. letter campaign).

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Visual Arts