Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Ultimate Bugopedia: The Most Complete Bug Reference Ever

National Geographic Society 2013. 272 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781426313769 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 595
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Layouts in brilliant colours show the insect world to dazzling effect in this big, fat book. Introductory spreads provide overviews on topics such as “Antennae,” “Defenses” and “Migration,” followed by details on dozens of insect species (and a section on spiders).

Readers may browse through the attractive, fascinating pages, or use their research skills with the detailed table of contents and index. With somewhat dense text, the language remains child-friendly (“If you’re unlucky enough to get head lice, don’t be embarrassed”) and delivers key facts (“The megastick’s eggs are unique. They … have little wings to help them scatter….”)

Gorgeous, close-up photography shows these creatures at their fiercest and finest. Children will go eye-to-eye with a praying mantis, see veins on dragonfly wings, witness weevils, beetles, fireflies and more. In one image, a pink flower petal forms the backdrop for the yellow fuzz on a bumblebee. In another, ants labour under giant green pieces of ripped leaf.

Between image and language, this book imparts an appreciation for these small but critical contributors to our ecosystem. Final sections discuss ways to study insects around us and rehabilitation for endangered insect species.

  •  As a class, brainstorm what you know about bugs and what you would like to know. Fill out a KWL chart and add to it as you find answers.
  •  

    Explore the structures and features of this book (captions, glossary, headings, labels, photos, etc.).

  •  Use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast two types of bugs featured in the book.
  •  Write an acrostic poem about a favourite bug, using information from the text.
  •  If you were a bug, what kind would you be? Write and draw to explain your thinking.
  •  As a class, brainstorm what you know about bugs and what you would like to know. Fill out a KWL chart and add to it as you find answers.
  •  

    Explore the structures and features of this book (captions, glossary, headings, labels, photos, etc.).

  •  

    With a partner, use the information on pages 12-13 and 257 to describe insects in the book. Add descriptive words to be more precise.

  •  

    Create a class list of insects found in your area.

  •  

    Review the words in the glossary. With a partner, make an educated guess about the meaning of each word. If neither of you is correct, add this word and its definition to a personal glossary.

  •  Write a new section for the book entitled Ten Cool Facts about Bugs. Create a digital poster to share this information with your peers.
  •  

    Choose a bug. Rewrite the information-based text from the book as a narrative text, written by the bug itself.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology