Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Two Frogs

Wormell, Christopher (Author/Illustrator)
Penguin Random House 2003. 32 pages
First published: 2003
ISBN: 9780099438625 (paperback)
9780224064743 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, figurative language, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Two frogs sit on a lily pad in the middle of a large quiet pond. One of them is a worrier, and holds a stick to fend off a potential predator, a dog. The second and more relaxed frog sees this is much ado about nothing, since there is no dog in sight, nor is there likely to be. “But what if a dog should come swimming across the pond and try to eat us up? Better safe than sorry,” argues the friend.

So begins this humorous fable about a hapless pair of anthropomorphic (but very realistic-looking) frogs embroiled in a debate that sees them narrowly escaping a toothy-jawed pike, a hungry heron and, ironically, a “champion javelin thrower who came to the pond that morning with his dog.” Within the sparse text are numerous opportunities for children to speculate: “What if he hadn’t laughed at his friend? What if they didn’t go stick-collecting? What if . . .?”

Large marine-hued watercolour illustrations (featuring the expressive faces of the frogs) along with witty dialogue and a final surprise twist produce an engaging read-aloud that children will beg to hear again and again.

  •  

    Discuss what makes the story funny. Introduce the concept of irony.

  •  Talk about the concept of inference. What can you infer from the illustrations, and how does that help you comprehend the story?
  •  With a partner, make a list of other ironic situations.
  •  Talk about fears you have and the things you do to alleviate your fear. Are your fears based in reality or not? Explain. Role play a situation giving it a less fearful twist.
  •  

    Talk about fables and what you know about them before reading.

  •  Discuss the story and why it is funny. What is the surprise ending? Do you worry about things that might happen to you? Explain.
  •  

    Make a class list of what if... scenarios. Stretch the what-if to its maximum. Give reasons to prove they will not come true.

  •  

    Explain the moral of the story.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Physical Education and Health