Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Twilight Comes Twice

Fletcher, Ralph (Author)
Kiesler, Kate (Illustrator)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 1997. 32 pages
First published: 1997
ISBN: 9780395848265 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

figurative language, layout, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Using imaginative language and warm, atmospheric illustrations, this book offers a subtle, soothing and rhythmic reading experience for children. “Twice each day/a crack opens/between night and day./Twice twilight/slips through that crack.”

Metaphor and anecdote are among the techniques employed in this story, depicting the hours of dusk and dawn in a quiet suburban town. For confident readers, it’s a great model for a creative writing class. For all readers, even better to sit back and enjoy the flow of the language. This is an excellent book for reading aloud.

The soft edges and warm colours of the illustrations cradle the words and emanate the theme of intimate, magic moments. A young girl wanders through town with her dog; they meet her mother coming home on the commuter train; they cuddle with her parents before supper. When dawn breaks, the two companions walk among dewy spider webs along the lake and bring home the family’s breakfast from the bakery.

Young readers can’t help but be settled and soothed by the homey, quiet mood pervading this special book.

  •  

    Discuss twilight, dawn and dusk. What do you know about these times of day? How are they affected by the seasons?

  •  

    Discuss the language used in the poem. How does it set the mood? What special literary devices are used in the poem?

  •  

    Rehearse the poem with a friend, adding sound effects from simple instruments. Present the poem to the class or record it as a podcast.

  •  

    Select an illustration from the book and write an accompanying poem.

  •  

    Discuss twilight, dawn and dusk. How do the seasons affect them?

  •  

    Discuss the poem. Find examples of metaphors where things in nature are compared to humans (e.g. “night and day stand whispering secrets”).

  •  

    Recite one of the verses and explain what you might see, smell or hear in the setting on that page.

  •  

    Write a verse that describes a photo or illustration of nature (perhaps from a calendar or magazine). 

  •  Where in the world might this story take place? List clues from the book cover. Compare lists with a neighbour.
  •  Which examples of dawn and dusk can you relate to in your personal life? Write these in your journal.
  •  With a partner, rewrite the story with a different part of the world as the setting.
  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use creativity
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology
  • Visual Arts