Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Tulip and Rex Write a Story

Massini, Sarah (Illustrator)
HarperCollins 2015. 32 pages
First published: 2015
ISBN: 9780062094162 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

It’s a beautiful spring morning, and the possibilities are endless. Tulip, a girl whose name and enthusiasm embody the very spirit of spring, leaps out of bed “with a hop and a spin.” While she’s proposing activities to her equally exuberant dog, Rex, a package arrives from Grandma, containing a notebook and a leash. ‘“That’s a great idea, Rex!’ said Tulip. ‘We’ll go for a walk.’”

Mixing traditional media and Photoshop, digital illustrations feature fresh tones that match the levity of the text. City scenes are vibrant thanks to an abundance of green spaces; cheery red tulips are a visual running theme, paying tribute to the heroine.

Outdoors, Tulip and Rex encounter myriad delights including a ladybug, a feather and a butterfly. "Polka dots make me want to hop," says Tulip, inspired by the ladybug. “‘H-O-P is such a happy word,’” she adds. "That’s another great idea, Rex! We’ll find more wonderful words like hop and tuck them into the notebook." Collecting fun words as one gathers seashells or rocks—flutter, feather, float—they soon have the makings of a story.

Tulip and Rex’s adventures pay tribute to the playfulness of creativity, demonstrating how much fun journaling and writing can be. Inspired by this friendly duo’s imagination and spontaneity, readers will get the sense that each morning is a brand new story just waiting to be discovered.

  •  

    Write out the steps that Tulip follows in creating her story with Rex. Discuss which stage you think is most important.

  •  

    Take your reader-writer’s notebook for a walk. Write down keywords and descriptions of interesting places, objects, people and animals. Write a story using these as a springboard.

  •  

    Read What Do You Do With an Idea? by Kobi Yamada and compare the two books using a Venn diagram. What do you learn?

  •  

    Read another picture book and do the opposite: list the words, objects, descriptions or settings that might have been the inspiration for writing the story.

  •  

    As a group, brainstorm and list words that you find interesting. Add to your list as you find others. Choose some to copy into your reader-writer’s notebook.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk and make predictions about the story. Then, take a word walk and notice the interesting words, especially all the verbs.

  •  

    Discuss how Tulip finds her interesting words. How is her process similar to or different from what you do to find interesting words?

  •  

    In pairs, take interesting words from the story and from the list, and write your own story, just as Tulip did.

  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being