Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Things That Float and Things That Don’t

Adler, David A. (Author)
Raff, Anna (Illustrator)
Holiday House 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780823428625 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 532
Book type: Non-Fiction

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Soap floats. A ball of aluminum foil sinks. But if that same ball of foil is flattened out and shaped into a boat, it floats! Why? And how is it possible that a huge ship made of steel floats? This introduction to the basics of flotation and density encourages children to make predictions, perform experiments with everyday objects and record their observations.

Adler immediately draws readers in by announcing they “could have fun guessing which things float and which things don’t” and then throwing out a lure — the first experiment. Simple, accessible language takes readers through several examples, explaining the principles in clear, concise language, while simultaneously modelling the Scientific Method — ask a question, construct a hypothesis, test the hypothesis, draw a conclusion.

The lively cartoon-style artwork, created with Sumi ink washes and drawings, is a perfect fit for a book about water and experimentation. Double spreads depict pencils and observation charts, tubs of water, objects floating or sinking, and eager children performing the suggested experiments.

Science meets literacy: The built-in experiments are easy enough to try at home or in the classroom, during or immediately following a read-aloud.

  •  

    Why do some things float or sink? Start a KWL chart. Write ideas on index cards so they can be moved around as you read and learn.

  •  

    Start a science journal with enough space for diagrams and notes. As you carry out the experiments, record your results and reflections.

  •  

    Prepare a Floating and Sinking interactive presentation for a younger class. Use information and ideas from the book.

  •  

    Why do some things float or sink? Start a KWL chart. Write ideas on sticky notes so they can be moved around as you read.

  •  

    Test other objects to determine whether they sink or float. Be sure to hypothesize first. Note your results on a chart similar to the one on page 9.

  •  

    Prepare a Floating and Sinking interactive presentation for a younger class. Use information and ideas from the book.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology