Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Unknown Soldier

Granfield, Linda (Author)
Scholastic Canada 2008. 38 pages
First published: 2008
ISBN: 9780439935586 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 355
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Written to commemorate those who died as “unknowns” in the world’s modern day conflicts, this war-themed book opens with a poem by the author, putting a face to the countless anonymous soldiers, “fresh-scrubbed and eager,” before launching in to her subject. Examining the memorials in 15 countries around the world, she honours the fallen soldiers, discusses the symbols on tombs and gravestones, and concludes with a reminder that we should never forget their sacrifices. Closer to home, readers will learn that Canada’s Unknown Soldier lies in a special tomb in the nation’s capital.

Thoroughly researched, the text is accessible, powerful and moving. Detailed captions support and annotate a variety of colour and black-and-white visuals.

Each country’s single or double-page spread weaves thought-provoking text and a grouping of images. The book contains over 100 historical and contemporary images—photographs, paintings, period postcards and memorabilia.

The book includes a timeline of significant events (1918 - 2004), a glossary and index.

  •  

    Discuss what you know about WWI and WWII. Create a timeline of important events and add to it as you read.

  •  

    On a picture walk, pinpoint the various countries and cities on a world map. Discuss the characteristics of the memorial stones and buildings.

  •  

    Explore monuments and events in your city or area. What is done to remember the soldiers who died at war?

  •  

    As you read the texts for each country, use a graphic organizer to compare the way different countries remember those who lost their lives in the war.

  •  

    Read about the DNA technology that enables identification of unknown soldiers (pages 29-30). Research how identification is possible so many years after a person’s death. Design a poster to explain your findings.

  •  

    Discuss what you know about WWI and WWII. Make a timeline of important events and add to it as you read.

  •  

    On a picture walk, pinpoint the various countries and cities on a world map. Discuss the characteristics of the memorial stones and buildings.

  •  

    Explore monuments and events in your city or area. What is done to remember the soldiers who died at war?

  •  As you read the texts for each country, use a graphic organizer to compare the way different countries remember those who lost their lives in the war.
  •  

    Read about the DNA technology that enables identification of unknown soldiers (pages 29-30). Research how identification is possible so many years after a person’s death. Design a poster to explain your findings.

  •  

    Many countries have Unknown Soldier memorials or monuments. In a small group, discuss what they are for and why they were created.

  •  As you read, look for similar elements among the memorials described for each country.
  •  

    Of all the memorials described, which one(s) would you like to visit? Why? Produce a podcast expressing your opinion and reasons.

  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology
  • Social Sciences