Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Three Snow Bears

Brett, Jan (Author/Illustrator)
Penguin Random House 2007. 32 pages
First published: 2007
ISBN: 9780399247927 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 398.2
Book type: Picture Book
Book genre: Fairy Tale

Text Elements:

character, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This Far North retelling of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” involves a raven-haired Inuit girl and three polar bears. While attempting to rescue her husky dogs that get stranded on an ice floe, little Aloo-Ki discovers a large igloo belonging to three polar bears – Papa, Mama and Baby – who seem to have stepped out for a walk while their breakfast cools. What happens when the bears return and discover Aloo-Ki sleeping in Baby Bear’s bed?

Readers will readily see the connection between this version and the beloved original, which share the same accusatory language: “Someone has been tasting my soup!” The somewhat familiar and straightforward text encourages reader prediction.

Dramatic paintings capture the chilling Arctic landscape and details of traditional Inuit culture. The border panels show what is going on simultaneously in the other scenes.

Favouring visuals over lengthy descriptions and explanations of culture and landscape, this twist on a familiar fairy tale can serve as a charming introduction to the Inuit way of life.

  •  

    Examine the endpapers. What information can you gather about the setting? Which activities are familiar?

  •  

    Look closely at the panels on each side of the main illustrations. Notice which perspective they represent. Describe the action.

  •  

    Draw and write to compare and contrast this story with the traditional version of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.”

  •  In groups, make puppets of the characters in the story. Retell the story using your puppets.
  •  

    Examine the cover and endpapers. What can you say about the setting? Learn the names of the activities portrayed (fishing, sliding, building an igloo, etc.).

  •  

    Go on a picture walk and discuss what the story is about. Listen to the story read aloud to confirm your predictions.

  •  

    Use the visuals from the author’s website to create character puppets for a choral reading or story retelling.

  •  

    Compare and contrast Aloo-ki’s story with a more traditional version of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.”

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • Citizenship and Community Life