Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Tea Party in the Woods

Miyakoshi, Akiko (Author/Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2015. 32 pages
First published: 2015
ISBN: 9781771381079 (hardcover)
9781771385947 (e-book)
Original language: Japanese
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“The woods were very still. And so quiet. Kikko’s footsteps were the only sound.” Being helpful and independent results in new adventures, during Kikko’s solo walk to Grandma’s house.

Elegant, pared-down language explores a range of emotions, such as, “The pie box was crushed. Kikko felt like crying. But her father was almost out of sight. So she picked up the box and hurried after him,” and “Kikko’s heart raced. She gathered up all her courage….”

Soft-edged illustrations in graphite hues make excellent use of paper-grain texture and warm colour highlights, to create sensitive and magical images. One gorgeous spread shows a new pie, pieced together with slices from the animals’ tea party delicacies: “seeds and nuts and fruit and other delicious things gathered from the woods.” Another shows everyone in a festive procession to Grandma’s house, through the bare trees and snow-shadows of a winter landscape.

That rich experiences are to be found in the wider world of independence is highlighted with Kikko’s triumphant arrival at Grandma’s. “‘My dear, did you come all this way on your own?’… “You’re never alone in the woods,’ Kikko answered, smiling.”

  •  Go for a picture walk. Discuss the use of colour. What do you think it means? Reflect on this question as you read.
  •  

    With a partner, make predictions as you read. Share and explain your predictions with the larger group. How do predictions help you think about a story?

  •  

    Work together to tell a story about animals who meet for a party. Use both pictures and words. 

  •  Go for a picture walk. Discuss the use of colour. What do you think it means?
  •  

    With a partner, compare Kikko’s story with a more classical version of the Red Riding Hood story. How are the stories similar or different? Use a Venn diagram or T-chart to show your thinking.

  •  

    Prepare a plan for the tea party. Look at the text and illustrations to confirm your choices. Include the guest list, menu, games, music, decorations, etc.

  •  

    Choose one page and use sticky notes to add speech bubbles to bring the story alive.

  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities