Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Snow Knows

Bisaillon, Josée (Illustrator)
Nimbus 2016. 32 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9781771084413 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Award

Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award – 2017

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

In this short, simple text, featuring animals that live in the snow, the words are minimal but carefully crafted for their sound, rhythm and rhyme: “The snow knows where the porcupine ponders and where the weasel bounds, up and down.”

The illustrations are done in mixed media, including collage. The snowy landscapes feature pale washes with collage trees and animals. One page reads: “The snow knows where the lynx slinks” and features a snowy meadow with a cut-out lynx peeking out from trees made of brown and green paper. In the distance, a wolf howls from behind a collage of coniferous trees. The setting sun is illustrated with a pale yellow wash. Overall, the palette is spare, with muted browns and greens amid the pale snowy landscapes.

The story covers a variety of animals, from the snowy owl to “coyotes choir.” There are some hints at predatory relationships, with an owl hovering over mice who “run, pitter-skitter” and a fox who is shown leaping in the air, mid-pounce.

The book finishes with a cut-and-paste child in an orange snowsuit making a snow angel: “The snow knows ... and now so do you.”

  •  Discuss what you think snow can “know.” If snow had a voice, what would it talk about? What could it tell you that would be helpful to you?
  •  As the story is read aloud, join in to choral read the repetitive patterns.
  •  Learn the names of the animals in the book.
  •  Use teacher-selected resources to connect the animals with their snow tracks.
  •  Why is it useful to know how to identify snow tracks? Whose jobs or lives depend on knowing animals and their tracks?
  •  Learn the names of the animals in the book.
  •  As the story is read aloud, join in to choral read the repetitive patterns. Explore the pages for more discoveries.
  •  Use teacher-selected resources to connect the animals with the snow tracks.
  •  Create a personalized version of the book that includes a few recurrent sentences, animal pictures and tracks.
  •  

    Explore the schoolyard or nearby park or forest for snow tracks to identify.

  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology