Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Kids Book of the Far North

Love, Ann (Author)
Drake, Jane (Author)
Bouchard, Jocelyne (Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2009. 48 pages
First published: 2000
Series: Kids Book of
ISBN: 9781554532582 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, setting, structures and features

Awards

Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction – Finalist – 2001
The Forest of Reading – The Silver Birch Award (Non-Fiction) Nominee – 2001

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This well-researched and in-depth look at the northern Polar Regions is an excellent introduction to the geography, ecology, people and way of life above the tree line. Encompassing the land shared by Canada, the United States (Alaska), Russia, Denmark (Greenland), Norway, Iceland, Sweden and Finland, this unique environment is explored through five chapters broken up with subheadings, text boxes, maps, timelines and stories from indigenous peoples.

Chapter headings include: “The Arctic Environment,” “Plant & Animal Life,” “Ancient Peoples,” “Arctic Riches” and “Everyday Life.” Text is dense yet direct, explaining unusual and interesting facts: “Descendants of Paleo-Eskimos, the Dorset people had no sturdy boats, but learned to hunt seals and walrus from the ice edge. Wearing notched-bone ice creepers on their feet to dig into ice, they threw harpoons with barbed blades that hooked under the skin and blubber of their prey.”

Readers learn about the survival tactics of plants, including the woolly lousewort that traps the sun’s heat, and the high sugar content of northern berries like the crowberry, cloudberry and bilberry that provide much needed energy to animals and humans.

Illustrations are colourful and realistic, depicting the snowy owl, caribou and polar bear as well as prehistoric animals, the northern lights and the way of life of the Indigenous peoples. Images break up the text nicely and provide a way into the visual landscape and complexity of this fragile eco-system.

  •  

    As a group, brainstorm what you know about the Far North. Write a list of your wonderings.

  •  

    Explore the table of contents and the index to find the way to answer your questions.

  •  

    Compare and contrast your current life with how it would be living at the North Pole. Use a Venn diagram to show your findings.

  •  

    Explore fiction stories set in the Far North. Which elements belong to reality and which ones belong to beliefs?

  •  

    The Far North has evolved tremendously over time. Write about how the lives of its inhabitants have changed. Would you say these changes have improved their lives?

  •  As a group, brainstorm what you know about the Far North. Write a list of questions you may have about it.
  •  

    Explore the Contents page and the Index to see if you can find a way to answer your questions.

  •  

    Compare and contrast how your life would be if you lived at the North Pole. Use a Venn diagram to show your findings.

  •  

    Explore fiction stories set in the far North. Which elements of the story do you think belong to reality and which ones belong to beliefs?

  •  

    Read the titles and subtitles in the table of contents. In small groups, discuss what you believe each section is about. Include as many details and examples as possible.

  •  

    While you read, take note of particularly expressive or colourful words that the author uses to describe the Far North and everything it comprises.

  •  

    Use the descriptive words you noted earlier to summarize your reading in the form of an informative video.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology