Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Hate U Give

Thomas, Angie (Author)
HarperCollins 2017. 458 pages
First published: 2017
ISBN: 9780062498533 (hardcover)
9780062498557 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Novel
Book genre: Realistic

Text Elements:

conflict, point of view, setting

Award

Boston Globe-Horn Book Award – 2017

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This novel of black lives, urban poverty and systemic racism offers a wealth of fascinating characters, portrayed with keen observation and stylish language.

Sixteen-year-old Starr is embedded in two very different cultures—a loving family home in a severely disadvantaged inner city neighbourhood, and the Williamson prep school she attends in a wealthy suburb. “Williamson Starr holds her tongue … so nobody will think she’s the ‘angry black girl’ … no stank-eyes, side-eyes none of that.… Basically Williamson Starr doesn’t give anyone a reason to call her ghetto.” But then she sees her friend Khalil killed by a police officer.

Both individual and systemic racism are shown through the subsequent investigation, grand jury trial and media representation of the shooting. The barriers between Starr’s worlds perforate as she discovers her own sense of justice and who are her real friends. “With everything that’s going on, what can [Momma] say? ‘Sekani saw the cops harass his daddy, but he’s doing so well in school. #ProudMom.’ Or, ‘Starr saw her best friend die, keep her in your prayers, but my baby made the honor roll again. #Blessed.’”

A balance between blessings and burdens is conveyed throughout this rich portrayal of family and community, struggles with both police- and gangster-culture, and Starr’s own search for peace and meaning.

  •  Parts of the text were inspired by the “Black Lives Matter” movement as well as select references to the work and life of rapper and activist Tupak Shakur. Read Tupak’s “The Rose that Grew from Concrete” prior to reading the novel.
  •  

    In small groups, discuss significant scenes that leave an impression on the reader and consider the way they contribute to the meaning of the story.

  •  

    Include the book as part of a text set to explore issues related to discrimination and social justice as part of literature circles that explore representations of African American youth in YA literature.

  • To exercise critical judgment
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Personal Development