Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Book With No Pictures

Novak, B.J. (Author)
Penguin Random House 2014. 48 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9780803741713 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

figurative language, point of view, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Strange sounds, funny phrases and varied type make this an excellent read-aloud book, even without images. Be prepared for a rowdy ride: “Everything the words say, the person reading the book has to say.”

The language is structured as a dialogue between the book and its reader, making interactive theatre out of the process of reading aloud: “And I have to say every word the book says? Uh-oh . . .” Child audiences will find it hilarious.

Colourful, varied type styles and sizes encourage extremely expressive reading. One spread covers two pages with the longest, strangest sound for readers to wrap their tongues around, ending in a big red, “Ba-DOOONGYFACE!!!!!”

Regular vocabulary includes words such as “silly,” “ridiculous” and “utterly preposterous!” as well as evocative images, such as “ROBOT MONKEY,” and “blueberry pizza,” and a song that begins, “glug glug glug my face is a bug . . .” The book ends with the reader begging children to choose books with pictures in the future, but this book has the final word: “BONK. I didn’t want to say that.”

  •  

    Discuss the reasons why this book is a success (uniqueness, funny words, well-known author). What is the message and which techniques are used to convey it?

  •  

    With a partner, take turns reading the story aloud. How do you know which voice to use when reading? Which part did you prefer and why?

  •  

    In small groups, imitate the author by brainstorming for crazy combinations of words to evoke images. Exchange your onomatopoeia words, sentences, rhymes, etc. with another group and note their reactions. Were they what you expected?

  •  

    Practise reading the book aloud with expression and intonation.

  •  

    Notice how the text features (e.g. size, colour, font, humour, simile) help you decide how to read the book.

  •  

    Take note of the different expressions. Sort them into ordinary expressions, silly expressions and onomatopoeias.

  •  

    Maintain an ongoing class list of ordinary expressions and practise using them appropriately.