Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

The Big Game

Tibo, Gilles (Author)
St-Aubin, Bruno (Illustrator)
Scholastic Canada 2012. 32 pages
First published: 2012
ISBN: 9781443119436 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Active, expressive language engages readers in the mystery of this story. Dad’s in a manic state, Mom’s a frenzied food-pusher, and neither of them can stop harping about hockey: “don’t forget to eat and stay hydrated. Make sure your skates are tight and that your helmet is done up properly. Remember your shoulder and knee pads, too!” With each new set of instructions and cautions, Nicholas replies, “Yeah, yeah . . . .”

Humorous illustrations in deft watercolour effects brilliantly portray the fraught spirit of this tale. One image shows Nicholas and his team during the pre-game pep-talk: their massive, gloved fists cling to their sticks, while an overwhelmed grimace distorts every face. Another spread shows the crowd engulfing the rink, raining urgings and advice down on the players.

Young readers may have their own experiences with overboard parental involvement; they’ll enjoy the plot twist, as Nicholas and his teammates rise above the hysteria to play their own game, their way. The final image reveals their secret, as the “serene” team pulls earplugs from their ears. This is a super-fun read, for both adults and children.

  •  

    Discuss the meaning of the expression “the big game.” Share personal experiences. What emotions are associated with a big game (for both player and spectator)? Use a web to record your ideas.

  •  

    As you read, make predictions about what will happen next. Reflect on how your web from the previous activity helps you make predictions.

  •  

    Work with a group to create a poster for parents, coaches or spectators. Establish some Dos and Don’ts for appropriate behaviour at sports events. Use text and images to communicate your message.

  •  

    Discuss the meaning of the expression “the big game.” Share personal experiences. What emotions are associated with a big game (for both players and spectators)? Use a web to record your ideas.

  •  

    Sort through the text for expressions related to feelings, encouragement and advice. Use a graphic organizer to record the information.

  •  

    In a small group, create a skit about a big event of your choice. Use some expressions from the story. Include a helpful element on focusing or handling pressure (such as Nicholas wearing earplugs).

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Media Literacy
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Physical Education and Health