Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

That Is Not a Good Idea!

Willems, Mo (Author/Illustrator)
HarperCollins 2013. 44 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780062203090 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

dialogue, point of view, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This fable is organized as if it were a silent movie. Colour illustrations are interspersed with black pages of bold white text that tell the tale of a courtly fox and a blushing goose who spy each other on the street. A silent movie-style title card asks, “Would you care to continue our walk into the deep, dark woods?” A group of round and engaging goslings look worried: “That is NOT a good idea!” they admonish. Children will appreciate the switch of roles, that the young goslings must caution their elders, over and over.

Large, clear type encourages early readers. Simple cartoon drawings bring humour to the perilous image of fox and goose, who lean over a boiling pot of soup: “Would you care to look at my soup? A key ingredient is missing.” “That is REALLY, REALLY, REALLY, REALLY NOT a good idea!” When read aloud, this book guarantees an expressive, suspenseful experience for everyone.

The hunter becomes the hunted when the goose knocks the wolf into his pot—to great splashing and a mild “Oh my!” from the wolf. In a final twist, the goslings march forward, soup spoons in hand: “Well, we DID try to warn him.”

  •  Talk about stranger safety. How was the ending a surprise?
  •  Make a podcast of the story with three players. Share it with others as the illustrations are shown.
  •  Research silent movies and how they get their message across. Watch a short silent movie and read the words aloud.
  •  

    Identify other situations that are not a good idea.

  •  

    Choose one of the situations, create new questions and act them out in pairs.

  •  

    Look for other polite ways of asking and answering questions such as “Would you care to . . . ?”

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Drama
  • Visual Arts