Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe

Leong, Tim (Author)
Chronicle Books 2013. 196 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781452113883 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multigenre, multimodal

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

For comics fans and neophytes alike, this book uses entertaining language and visually striking infographics to chart an abundance of facts about characters, creators, colour use and much, much more. An introduction leads with several engaging charts, including “Reasons for the charts,” a two-piece pie chart (“TO INFORM” “TO ENTERTAIN”) which also shows the relative proportion of “Charts that are funny” and “Charts that are not as funny as I think they are.”

Page upon lustrous page of comics-related data follows, mapped in vivid colour (“The Pizzas of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”), attractive design grids (“Cerebus: Judging a Comic by Its Cover”) and an imaginative range of factors. One example shows scatter plot charts of “Popular Costumes” to map those worn by cartoon characters, Star Wars characters, underwater heroes and villains, and Johnny Depp in movie roles. These are ranged along high-to-low scales of “Dignity” and “Amount of Skin Shown.”

This lighthearted analysis can also be thought-provoking, such as in the stylishly modified pie chart “Power Publishers,” in which the vastly dominant territory is held by only two. Or the “Politics of Good and Evil” matrix that plots a range of characters’ political ideologies and the bar chart describing “70 Years of Wonder Woman’s Legs.” An index and a very unique acknowledgments chart complete this appealing book.

  •  

    Discuss the types of graphics that are used in the text and share the introductory graphic that demonstrates the affordances of charts.

  •  

    Choose a selection of graphic representations of phenomena and explore what the different types of graphs have to offer. What does a table do that a pie chart cannot do? Use examples from the text to illustrate your ideas.

  •  

    Use the “My Bookshelf” graphic as a model to create a graph representing a personal, classroom or library bookshelf.

  •  

    In a small group, document the similarities among comic books, from names to costumes to storylines. How do North American superhero comic books compare to mangas?

  •  

    As you read, note any comic book characters you've never heard of and would like to learn more about.

  •  

    Select one of the featured superheroes and compile all the given information on them. Assemble it into a presentation for the class.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To use information
  • Visual Arts