Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Stick and Stone

Ferry, Beth (Author)
Lichtenheld, Tom (Illustrator)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2015. 44 pages
First published: 2015
ISBN: 9780544032569 (hardcover)
9780544657458 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, figurative language

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“A zero. A one. Alone is no fun.” Right from the start, children will appreciate the wit of this book’s language and drawings, as the very different physical attributes of Stone (zero) and Stick (one) are highlighted.

The two creatures meet on the playground, then bond over some mean teasing by Pinecone: “Makes fun of Stone. Won’t leave him alone.” Illustrations of simple form and line use warm colours and pastel textures to portray the extremely appealing characters in humorous, cartoon-like settings. One sequence shows Stone picking up speed down a hill to bounce off a log, splash into a puddle and dislodge Stick, who’s stuck: “KER-sPLooSH!” (“‘You rock, Stone,’ says Stick.”)

Sweet, fun images and clever word play will have beginning readers devouring this brief ode to friendship. They may wish to reflect on the qualities that make their own friends unique. The story’s ending revisits the beginning, with an important twist: “Stick, Stone. A perfect 10.” And in a final, heartwarming note, youngsters will see that it’s never too late to be a friend, as the buddies are joined by Pinecone (“Sorry I needled you so much….”)

  •  

    Share personal experiences involving making friends. How did you meet? What made your friendship grow? As you read, make connections between your friendships and the one between Stick and Stone.

  •  Describe and discuss what is happening on each page by elaborating on the concise text.
  •  Use props to act out the story.
  •  

    Write a letter from the point of view of Stick or Stone to the other character. Talk about what makes your friendship great.

  •  

    Use the cover and endpapers to make predictions about the story.

  •  

    After the story is read aloud, discuss what makes a good friend. Write the ideas on a class chart.

  •  

    In small groups, dramatize the story. Add dialogue.

  •  

    Describe your friend. What makes them special? Include ideas from the class chart. Add a picture or drawing to your text.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being