Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Stella, Princess of the Sky

Gay, Marie-Louise (Author/Illustrator)
Groundwood Books 2010. 32 pages
First published: 2004
ISBN: 9781554980727 (paperback)
9780888996015 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

dialogue, point of view, setting

Award

The Forest of Reading – The Blue Spruce Award Nominee – 2006

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Stella takes readers on a romp through nature as she answers all of Sam’s questions about what he observes, from the fiery sky at sunset to the North Star that lights the way for polar bears.

The book’s whimsical pencil-and-watercolour illustrations, which begin with soft oranges and pinks and graduate to the cooler pastel hues of night, effectively capture the changing light of day that finally incites them to camp all night under the luminous sky. The innocence of the young brother and sister as they engage in their rich meditation about the physical world comes through in the poetry of their descriptions, which accompany the pastel illustrations: The Milky Way is “a glass of milk spilled by the moon,” while the moon “floats in the air like a balloon.”

Parents, teachers, and students will enjoy this visually and linguistically eloquent book in different ways, which can be read quietly at bedtime or shared aloud at storytime. It can also serve as an introduction to astronomy or poetry, or as a discussion-starter on the nocturnal wonders that surround us.

  •  

    Choose an image from the book and imagine it as something else (a blade of grass becomes a sword for fighting mosquitoes, a snail is a secret agent carrying messages in his shell).

  •  

    Talk about the descriptive language that is used, such as The sky is on fire, fluffy clouds, moon floats in the air, quick as lightning . . . .

  •  

    Imagine that you are going camping. What would you need to bring? Do you think you would feel brave like Stella or worried like Sam, if you were sleeping outside without your parents?

  •  

    Sam asks many questions in this story. Practise using question words (who, what, why, wherewhen, how) by imagining your own questions.

  •  

    Brainstorm different ways of attributing dialogue, such as cried, whispered, added, called, answered. Discuss the differences between these words and start an anchor chart.

  •  

    Choose different categories into which you could sort the words from the text (things in the ground, actions, insects). Sort them using a graphic organizer.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Drama
  • Science and Technology