Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Someday a Tree

Bunting, Eve (Author)
Himler, Ronald (Illustrator)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 1993. 32 pages
First published: 1993
ISBN: 9780395764787 (paperback)
9780395613092 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, point of view, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This is the evocative and poetic story of a young girl named Alice who, along with her parents and neighbours, struggles to save a dying oak tree that has been poisoned by a chemical spill. Friends and community members pitch in by hauling soil, watering the tree and protecting it from the sun, but to no avail. Sad and dismayed at losing a tree that has been at the centre of countless family memories, Alice remembers something that gives her hope for the future—the jar of acorns she collected before the tree got sick.

Double-page illustrations rendered in gentle watercolour convey the important message about protecting our environment that lies behind this poignant read-aloud for older children.

The story can work as an excellent tie-in with a unit on environmental issues or to initiate a discussion on cause and effect relationships. It can also serve as a way to introduce the idea of death to a child, and the value of finding a treasure that will help the memory live on.

  •  

    If possible, read outside under a tree. Share stories your parents have told you about childhood events (birth, christening, moving, etc.).

  •  Discuss the importance of trees in our world: how they help the environment, bring shade, reduce pollution, etc.
  •  

    Through research, find out the many benefits of trees and write them on fact cards. As a bulletin display, make a large paper tree and use the fact cards (perhaps in a leaf shape) as the leaves of the tree.

  •  

    Write a poem about a tree in different seasons or at different times of the day, or about the different animals that live in it.

  •  

    If possible, read outside under a tree. Share stories your parents have told you about childhood events (birth, christening, moving, etc.).

  •  Discuss the importance of trees in our world: how they help the environment, bring shade, reduce pollution, etc.
  •  

    Through research, find out the many benefits of trees and write them on fact cards. As a bulletin display, make a large paper tree and use the fact cards (perhaps in a leaf shape) as the leaves of the tree.

  •  

    Write a poem about a tree in different seasons or at different times of the day, or about the different animals that visit it.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology