Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Snow

Shulevitz, Uri (Author/Illustrator)
Macmillan 2011. 32 pages
First published: 1998
ISBN: 9780374468620 (paperback)
9780374370923 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Awards

Caldecott Honor Book – 1999
Golden Kite Award – 1999
Charlotte Zolotow Award – 1999

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“‘It’s snowing,’ said boy with dog./‘It’s only a snowflake,’ said grandfather with beard.” So begins this enchanting tale about a boy and his dog celebrating the first snowfall while the rest of the townspeople pooh-pooh it. The naysayers include man with hat, woman with umbrella, and even the weather forecasters who seem to have forgotten the magical excitement that “circling and swirling, spinning and twirling” snow can bring.

Spare poetic text recreates the hush of the cityscape as it gradually becomes blanketed in snow. Never more than one to three lines to a page, the text aims for concision, simplicity and a gentle lightheartedness.

Stylized illustrations in pen-and-ink and watercolour depict “man with hat” and the other characters with exaggerated traits and proportions, and eloquently capture the transformation of the dreary, grey city into a snow-filled wonderland. In one scene, a cast of Mother Goose characters leaps out of a bookstore to join the boy and his dog in the frolicking fun.

An excellent seasonal read-aloud, this book deftly celebrates the unshakeable faith of children in a world often defined by cynicism and mistrust.

  •  

    Do a picture walk and make predictions about the characters, setting and plot.

  •  Reread the story, paying attention to the characters on the bookstore sign. Tell the story from their point of view.
  •  How do the different characters in the story feel about snow? Brainstorm a list of reasons why people might like or dislike snow. How do you feel about it?
  •  What might happen after the story ends? Write and illustrate a new page for the book.
  •  

    Go for a picture walk and discuss the characters from Mother Goose.

  •  

    After the story is read aloud, discuss the different characters’ reactions to the snow. How do you react to falling snow? How about your family?

  •  

    Listen to or read different weather reports and compare them to the actual weather conditions. What do you notice?

  •  

    Create a list of words about snow from your prior knowledge and from the book. Find ways to organize the words in categories. Create a class anchor chart. Add to it as you find new snow-related words.

  •  

    Create short poems (acrostic, Haiku) about snow. Use words and expressions from the book.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Visual Arts