Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

See Saw Saskatchewan

Ritchie, Scot (Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2003. 32 pages
First published: 2003
ISBN: 9781553379683 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 811
Book type: Anthology
Book genre: Poetry

Text Elements:

recurring patterns, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This collection of three dozen poems explores Canadian places, characters and motifs. From “Eenie Meenie Manitoba” to PEI and Chicoutimi, readers can giggle along at the verbal antics of the likes of Little Monty Mountie, Alberta Rose or Ready Eddie Edmonton. The vocabulary is extremely accessible and the subject matter goofy: the poems feature socks tossed in the sea, a king losing his underpants and even a “barenaked prairie run.” The colourful cartoonish spot illustrations are equally high-spirited, with pole-vaulting polar bears and a raven wearing a toque.

The poems are interspersed with trivia about the province’s official birds or flowers, as well as with easy to understand information about the poems: notes below the poems tell us that one is a “tangletalk rhyme,” while another is a circular poem that “keeps going around and around and around.” While not strictly formal, the poems are all extremely rhythmic and most of them play with rhyme, half rhyme and internal rhyme. “Take Toronto by the Toe,” one poem suggests, “Grab it,/Nab it,/Don’t let go!/Clip its toenails./Comb its hair./Put it in fresh underwear.”

Here you will find poetry that is full of fun, inspired by geography.

  •  

    Read the first poem, “Skate Canada.” Use a map of Canada to locate and name the provinces that are referred to.

  •  

    In pairs, choose one of the poems, practise reciting it and add some actions. Teach it to the rest of the class.

  •  

    Write a poem about your province, using a similar style.

  •  Make a picture dictionary of important Canadian people, places and things. Use the book as inspiration. Work with your group to decide what to include.
  •  

    As a group, use prior knowledge to name the provinces of Canada. What do you know about them?

  •  

    In pairs, choose one of the poems, practise reciting it and add some actions to it. Teach it to the rest of the class.

  •  

    Fill in a graphic organizer with information given about the provinces, such as the official flower and bird. Use teacher-selected resources to find other official elements for each province (animal, fish, tree, motto, etc.).

  •  

    Create a poem about your province, using a similar style.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Geography, History and Citizenship