Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Saving Lives & Changing Hearts: Animal Sanctuaries and Rescue Centres

Laidlaw, Rob (Author)
Fitzhenry & Whiteside 2012. 62 pages
First published: 2012
ISBN: 9781554552122 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 333.95
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

setting

Award

The Forest of Reading – The Silver Birch Award (Non-Fiction) Nominee – 2014

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Thirteen chapters address the various kinds of animal sanctuaries: farm animal sanctuaries for the likes of cows, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens and turkeys; equine sanctuaries for horses, donkeys and mules; and wild animal sanctuaries for a wide range of creatures “from hedgehogs to elephants.” The difference between a sanctuary and a rescue centre, which sends animals back to the wild, is explained. A variety of centres and sanctuaries are examined in depth, for creatures as varied as pigs, camels, chimps and raptors. Information about the basic needs of animals is included.

Sanctuaries and rescue centres from around the world are presented, but the chapter “From Science to Sanctuary” is of particular interest because it focuses on the Fauna Foundation, located here in Québec, and its work with chimpanzees rescued from research laboratories and zoos. Also included in this chapter is information about the Jane Goodall Institute’s Tchimpounga Sanctuary in Africa, as well as two American primate sanctuaries.

Dynamic layouts include adorable quality photographs of animals and their caretakers (“Everyone at the Donkey Sanctuary of Canada is smiling”) and informative (“If oiled birds aren’t cleaned of the toxin, they are unlikely to survive”).

The final chapters focus on reader awareness and action. “Phony Sanctuaries—When a Sanctuary isn’t a Sanctuary” provides guidelines for discriminating visitors. “Become a Sanctuary & Rescue Centre Hero” sets out simple activities that support animal rehabilitation. The introduction describes a personal encounter with rescue animals in India; back material includes a glossary, a list of organizations and a helpful index.

  •  

    With three partners, create a jigsaw activity where each member selects one or more section(s) of the book, reads them and reports back on their findings. Have a group discussion to synthesize your learning.

  •  

    Choose a featured animal and research its natural habitat. How well are the animals doing in the sanctuary compared to the natural habitat?

  •  

    Be a rescue centre hero. Take action by choosing, planning and sharing how and when you will be part of the solution.

  •  

    Get to know sanctuaries better. Choose an animal sanctuary website (page 58) and write an investigative piece to let others know what the sanctuary stands for, what they are helping and how.

  •  

    Brainstorm why animal sanctuaries and rescue centres are needed. Write a list of questions you have about these centres.

  •  

    In pairs, choose one of the chapters and create a poster or slideshow to promote the work of a rescue centre.

  •  

    Determine whether there is a rescue centre or an animal sanctuary in your area. Devise a way to publicize their work.

  •  

    With a partner, write a definition for animal sanctuary. Compare your definitions as a class. Agree on several favourite definitions.

  •  

    With three partners, create a jigsaw activity where each member selects one or more section(s) of the book, reads them and reports back on their findings. Have a group discussion to synthesize your learning.

  •  Reflect and write a journal entry about how you’ve been inspired to take action for animals in need of help.
  •  

    Research an eco-tourist site. Make a poster or pamphlet to advertise a vacation there showing how you can effect positive change for its animals or people.

  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology