Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Santa Claus and the Three Bears

Modugno, Maria (Author)
Dyer, Jane (Illustrator)
Dyer, Brooke (Illustrator)
HarperCollins 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780061700231 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book
Book genre: Fairy Tale

Text Elements:

character

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This take on a nursery classic revels in holiday details: “The stockings were hung and the tree was decorated when Mama Bear called everyone to dinner. She put the Christmas pudding in a great big bowl for Papa Bear . . . .” The family decides to go for a walk while dinner cools. “We can see all the Christmas lights.”

Bright, bold and gorgeously detailed illustrations make the most of holiday decorations, a rosy Santa and a profusion of prints and patterns in the polar bears’ home. Once Santa mistakes the pudding as a snack laid out for him, children may recognize lines that pay homage to the original story: “too hot! . . . too cold! . . . just right . . . and he ate it all up!” Santa’s great, red bottom smashes through Baby Bear’s chair. His black boots peek from under Baby Bear’s quilt, as he lies down for a nap.

Discovered by the Bear family, Santa cries, “Oh no! And ho, ho, ho!” In a nice twist at the end, Baby Bear—not Papa Bear—receives the “great big present” from Santa.

  •  

    Without looking at the cover or reading the title, examine the illustration of the three chairs on the title page. What do you think the story might be about, based on this illustration? Revisit your predictions as you read.

  •  Act out the familiar parts of the story, taking turns as the different characters.
  •  

    Write down and draw the gifts you think the three bears might receive from Santa.

  •  

    Look at the cover and brainstorm what you know about the traditional story of The Three Bears. Make a class list of words and ideas used in your discussion. Make predictions about the story.

  •  Do a picture walk to tell the story from the pictures. Use the expressions you know from previous versions.
  •  

    In small groups, retell the story by acting it out.

  •  

    Compare and contrast this book with other versions of The Three Bears. Use a graphic organizer to show your findings.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being