Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Reptiles

Holland, Simon (Author)
DK 2013. 56 pages
First published: 2002
Series: Eye Wonder
ISBN: 9781465409089 (hardcover)
9781465421388 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 597.9
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multigenre, multimodal, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

An excellent resource, this in-depth account of reptiles is sure to engage readers with its lively text and beautiful full-colour photographs. Starting with the classification of reptiles using their Latin names, chapters are grouped by subject matter, such as how reptiles use their senses, which ones are poisonous and what they do to survive.

From lizards to turtles, crocodiles to snakes and the rare tuataras, the text is full of fascinating facts about these ancient, cold-blooded creatures: “Sea snakes are the most poisonous snakes in the world” and “Sea turtles cry salty tears. This is to get rid of any extra, unwanted salt they swallowed as they swim and feed.” Text is concise, informative and often takes a conversational tone: “Other sea creatures need not be afraid, though, because this monster of the deep is definitely a vegetarian. It eats only seaweed.”

Packed with gorgeous, up-close nature photography, images break up the many small paragraphs of text. Text sometimes arcs around a creature; page layouts occasionally switch from landscape to portrait. Facts are contained in boxes called “Reptile File.”

With 25 double-page spreads with quirky titles like: “Let’s Do Lunch” “Some Like It Hot” and “I Will Survive,” different subject areas can be dipped into easily. Included are true and false questions, a matching game and quizzes at the back of the book, as well as a glossary, a habitats index and a general index.

  •  

    What is a reptile? Make a class anchor chart based on your background knowledge and your new discoveries.

  •  

    Look closely at the “Who Am I?” questions on page 48 and try to figure out which reptile is featured.

  •  

    Try your hand at passing the clues quiz (pages 50-51). Create your own quiz in the same style.

  •  

    Choose a reptile that interests you and determine its habitat (page 55). On a safe, student-friendly site, do some research on this reptile’s habitat. Make a poster to show what you have learned.

  •  

    Use the subtitles in the table of contents to predict what reptile or topic will be covered in the different sections. For example, “Let’s Do Lunch” is about the food reptiles eat.

  •  

    What is a reptile? Make a class anchor chart based on your background knowledge and your new discoveries.

  •  

    Look closely at the “Who Am I?” questions on page 48 and try to figure out which reptile is featured.

  •  

    Try your hand at passing the clues quiz (pages 50-51). Create your own clues quiz in the same style.

  •  

    Think of the coolest features or characteristics that you know about reptiles, then share and discuss your answers in a small group. Who has the coolest (oddest, grossest) information?

  •  

    As you read, pay attention to the specific text that goes with each image.

  •  

    Select one of the featured reptiles and do further research on it. Using additional images, prepare a digital presentation for the class.

  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology