Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Replica/Lyra

Oliver, Lauren (Author)
HarperCollins 2016. 526 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9780062394163 (hardcover)
9780062394170 (paperback)
9780062394187 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Novel
Book genre: Dystopian

Text Elements:

setting, stance

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Two separate yet connected novels—bound back-to back into a single volume—relate a story of science perverted, conspiracy, murder, family secrets and the two teens who unravel it all with help from friends.

Each side of the story is imbued with the distinct view of its respective protagonist. The language on Lyra’s side brilliantly conveys a numbed, objective awareness, reflecting her lifetime as an early-model, human “replica” at the heavily guarded Haven Institute: “Nurse Swineherd kept talking while she took Lyra’s blood pressure with Squeezeme and stuck Thermoscan under her tongue.” In contrast, Gemma’s side is written in the chatty tone of an ordinary teenager: “April had to hop, haul, and wiggle to get into her jeans. Her preferred fit, she always said, was human sushi roll. Gemma’s was airy trash bag.”

Both sides share a compelling mystery that’s driven by action-fuelled plot. Explosions, car chases and night-wanderings through Florida marshland are among the many challenges faced by the girls and their friends, as they unlock old secrets—and find themselves anew.

  •  

    Replica offers two interconnected narratives in a unique format that can be read in different ways. Each story explores a different side of issues related to cloning and the pursuit of medical knowledge, specifically the way modern biotechnology has influenced how we think about ourselves.

  •  

    In small groups, discuss how the text presents issues related to life and what makes us human; specifically, the impact on the individuals who are created using reproductive technology.

  •  

    In a reader-writer’s notebook, write as much as possible about the following text excerpt: “H-U-M-A-N … There were two kinds of humans: natural-born humans, people, women and men, girls and boys … then there were human models, males and females, made in the laboratory and transferred to the surrogate birthers.”

  • Health and Well-Being
  • Science and Technology