Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Red Is Best

Stinson, Kathy (Author)
Lewis, Robin Baird (Illustrator)
Annick Press 2006. 30 pages
First published: 1982
ISBN: 9781554510511 (paperback)
9781554510528 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A child’s stubborn preference for red will resonate with children in this tale of a mother and her spirited young daughter, Kelly, who disagree about which boots, jacket, stockings, etc., are appropriate for the moment.

Kelly announces she likes her red barrettes best because “they make (her) hair laugh.” She prefers the red paint to the orange because “it puts singing in my head.”

Although her mom’s well-intentioned protests might be sensible (“your brown mitts are warmer”), anything red, according to Kelly, is best. Red mitts “make better snowballs;” red boots “take bigger steps,” all of which lead to the repeated phrase “I like my red __ the best.”

This excellent read-aloud could accompany a discussion of colours, individual preferences and even figurative language.

Simple text with imaginative comparisons and expressive, uncluttered line illustrations punctuated with vibrant splashes of red have made this story a Canadian classic.

  •  

    Discuss favourite colours and the reasons why you like one in particular.

  •  

    Make a class chart with the names of objects of different colours.

  •  

    Make a class book about colours. For each object, write: A red___.

  •  

    Play a game: Each student has cards printed colour words. When the teacher calls out an object (pumpkin) or shows a picture, hold up the correct word card (orange).

  •  Play a memory matching game with the objects from the story. To increase the challenge, include the sets of objects in two or three different colours.
  •  

    Discuss favourite colours and the reasons why you like one in particular.

  •  

    Learn and practise the vocabulary words about clothes and other objects.

  •  

    Make a class chart with the names of objects and their colours.

  •  

    Make a class book about colours. For each object, write: A red___.

  •  

    Play a game in which one person names an object (pumpkin) and a partner holds up the correct word card (orange).

  •  

    Play a memory matching game with objects from the story. To increase the challenge, include the sets of objects in two or three different colours.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • Visual Arts