Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Real Stories From Street Children Across the World

Allan, June (Illustrator)
Quarto 2014. 36 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9781847804341 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 305.23
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

multimodal, point of view, setting, stance

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

The lives of street children are portrayed through the voices (and photos) of the children themselves. Students will be impressed by the hardship these children face with equanimity, and even optimism. Miguel explains he has been living on the streets of Maputo and Benfica, Mozambique, since he was 10 years old. Valerie is luckier—the youngest of four, she is the only family member never to have slept in the streets of her hometown, Guatemala City.

These kids (and two families) briefly relate their life histories, their situations today and their hopes for the future. The simple language leads students through sometimes difficult information: “I didn’t know who he was. He said he wanted me to go to school … I became his slave. I had to do all his housework.” But most stories end with hope: “I asked for help and got it. My life will change.”

Young readers will appreciate the abundant photographs and illustrations of the children and their settings. An introduction and back material help put these particular children’s stories into a global context. This valuable book brings the importance of children’s rights into focus in a way that will surely connect with fellow children.

  •  

    Look closely at the photographs and drawings. What do you notice most? What can you tell about the children’s lifestyles from looking at the backgrounds? What emotions do you see on the faces of the children?

  •  

    Discuss the symbolism of the ripped photo edges and ragged text boxes.

  •  

    Talk about the difficulties faced by street children (and their families). Why is it important to support charitable organizations? How have the different centres impacted the lives of some of the children?

  •  

    According to the book, there are approximately 100-150 million street children worldwide. How can you (or your class) make a difference? Create posters that reveal the plight of street children. 

  •  

    Create a class Gratitude Journal. Document things and people in your life that you are grateful for.

  •  

    Discuss the plight of these children. Write words that represent their lives onto a class anchor chart.

  •  

    Look up the word resilience in the dictionary. Discuss its meaning. How are these children brave and how do they show their optimism? Write a list of these character traits.

  •  

    Choose a child from the book. Create a Venn diagram to show how you and a child from the book (or two children from the book) are the same and different.

  •  

    Write a text about yourself. How is your life different from these children’s lives? Write about how you are grateful to live your own life.

  •  

    What solutions or organizations do we have here (or elsewhere in the world) for street children such as these? 

  •  Prior to reading, write a short paragraph surmising why there are street children in the world. Discuss as a class.
  •  Listen to one of the stories. During a second listening, take notes and gather keywords. Turn and talk to a partner about your understanding of the child’s story.
  •  Encourage others to care. Create an informative and moving poster about this cause or another. Display posters throughout the school.
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To solve problems
  • To use creativity
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Physical Education and Health