Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Real-Size Baby Animals: Discover the True Sizes of Your Favorite Animal Babies!

Greenwood, Marie (Author)
Riggs, Jenna (Illustrator)
DK 2012. 32 pages
First published: 2012
ISBN: 9780756690120 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 599.13
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Did you know that some owls can eat up to a thousand mice a year? And that Dalmatian puppies are born without black spots? Did you know that female lions do most of the hunting and that lemurs sometimes wave their smelly tails in the air to warn rivals to stay away? Children will discover the true shapes and sizes of baby animals, from cute kittens and playful puppies to baby chimps and toothy crocodiles in this fun, fact-filled read-aloud showcasing the characteristics, habitats and habits of over a dozen wild and domestic animals.

The visually pleasing spreads consist of short introductory paragraphs in simple lively language, information boxes, snappy facts, colour drawings, small- and large-font captions and stunning photographs. Some of the larger animals featured appear on gatefold pages that open to reveal their actual size. Measurements, provided in both metric and imperial units, compare the size of each species at birth and during adulthood.

A great resource for the classroom, the book comes with a colourful 58-inch growth chart to hang on the wall for readers to compare their heights to those of some of the baby animals. It also includes a glossary of unfamiliar words referenced in the text (e.g. bonding, camouflage, grooming, predator).

  •  

    As you read, discuss similarities and differences between animal and human babies.

  •  

    Add labels to a world map, indicating where some of the baby animals live. Use information from the text.

  •  

    Create a growth chart on large butcher paper using a metre stick or tape measure. Use pictures and words to mark the heights of some baby animals. Add the heights of your group members.

  •  

    If you were a baby animal, which would you be? Write and draw to explain your answer. Use facts from the book, where possible.

  •  As the book is read aloud, discuss the similarities and differences of animal and human babies.
  •  

    Pay attention to the names of males, females, young and living spaces. Create categorized anchor charts and add to the lists as you go.

  •  

    List the ways that animal parents care for their young ones. Compare this to how humans care for their babies.

  •  

    Design a bookmark about your favourite baby animal. Write a few facts about it.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Mathematics
  • Physical Education and Health
  • Science and Technology