Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Peck, Peck, Peck

Cousins, Lucy (Author/Illustrator)
Candlewick Press 2013. 28 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780763666217 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

point of view, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A young woodpecker gets a lesson in pecking a hole in a tree from his dad and is so enthused with his new-found skill that he sets off to test it out on just about everything he finds: a gate, the front door to a house, and then most of its contents, including clothes, books, “an eggplant, a tangerine, a butter dish, a nectarine, a green bean, a sardine, and seventeen jelly beans.” By the time this little bird is through, the pages look a bit like Swiss cheese. Tired out, he curls up in his nest as his proud father kisses him goodnight.

Thick, bold, hand-lettered font leaps off the page, making the repetitions like “peck, peck, peck” really stand out. Packed with rhythm and rhyme, the simple text packs a punch – with quotes from the voice of the father, an exuberant first-person narrative from the young bird and lots of vocabulary to absorb. “Today my daddy said to me, ‘It’s time you learned to peck a tree.’” “So off I flew – I couldn’t wait – across the grass and onto the gate.”

The artist employs bright primary colours and thick black outlines in her gouache illustrations. Their warm, feel-good liveliness beautifully matches the text. The physical holes in the pages are a nice visceral touch, and each page of text is offset with a different solid colour.

A fun read for young audiences.

  •  Make predictions about the story based on the title and cover illustration.
  •  

    Read along with the parts that repeat: “peck, peck, peck.”

  •  

    Name the different objects in which the woodpecker makes holes.

  •  Write a letter to the woodpecker explaining the consequences of his work.
  •  

    Create a new illustration by drawing a new place in which the woodpecker might have pecked holes. Use a hole punch or small scissors to make holes in your picture, similar to the book.

  •  

    Look at the title, cover and endpaper illustrations. What do you see? Make predictions about the story.

  •  

    As the story is read aloud, join in for the repetitive “peck, peck, peck” parts.

  •  

    Play a memory game to practise English using the pictures and words.

  •  

    Use magazine pictures of homes to create new practice ground for the young woodpecker. Punch holes in specific areas of the page. Add text in the same style, using words you know and words from the book.

  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Personal and Career Planning