Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Peach Girl

Bender, Rebecca (Illustrator)
Pajama Press 2014. 32 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9781927485583 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book
Book genre: Folklore

Text Elements:

character, figurative language, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This fun tale begins with the origins of Momoko, a little girl who is born from a peach. Dressed in peach skins, and protected by a pit-helmet, the intrepid heroine sets off to “make the world a better place.”

Momoko enlists the aid of various animals in her quest to find a child-eating ogre. Monkey, Dog and Pheasant all express doubts. Children will enjoy the teasing, when Monkey suggests Dog is a “scaredy-cat” and Dog accuses Pheasant of being “chicken.” With each animal, the Ogre’s fearsome traits increase: “bigger than a tree,” “teeth like knives,” “eyes that shoot flames.”

Large painted illustrations depict traditional Japanese landscapes and architecture; the realistic animal characters are wonderfully expressive. Readrs may identify with the animals huddling before the ogre’s huge plank door, or Momoko herself, as she boldly clangs the brass knocker. In a charming turnaround, the ogre refuses to open up (“Are you, by any chance, bigger than a tree?”) until he’s assured his visitors are perfectly harmless. Readers of any age will appreciate this lighthearted story about overcoming fears to achieve friendship and mutual understanding.

  •  

    Make connections with characters in well-known fairy tales such as Thumbelina, The Little Red Hen and Jack and the Beanstalk. What traits do these characters share with Momoko?

  •  

    Before reaching the end, draw a picture of what you think the ogre will look like based on all the rumours.

  •  

    Use the illustrations and text details to infer how the characters are feeling as the story progresses.

  •  

    What do Momoko and the animals learn about friendship?

  •  Use the illustrations and the details in the text to infer how the characters are feeling as the story progresses.
  •  

    Make connections with characters in well-known fairy tales such as Thumbelina, The Little Red Hen and Jack and the Beanstalk. What traits do these characters share with Momoko?

  •  

    Before reaching the end, draw a picture of what you think the ogre will look like based on all the rumours. With a partner, discuss how your pictures are similar or different.

  •  

    Create a character map of the main character – include both her outer and inner characteristics.

  •  

    Use the story as a model for writing a tall tale. (IE)

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Ethics and Religious Culture