Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Oops, Pounce, Quick, Run!: An Alphabet Caper

Twohy, Mike (Author/Illustrator)
HarperCollins 2016. 32 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9780062377005 (hardcover)
9780062459534 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, recurring patterns

Award

Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book – 2017

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A fun way for kids to learn their ABCs, this comical caper begins when a snoozing mouse is abruptly woken by a ball bouncing into his living room.

Each letter of the alphabet gets its own page and is featured by one word or phrase beginning with that letter. The text is succinct yet powerful when paired with cartoonish illustrations: “Asleep” reads the first page. Above the napping mouse, the letter A is capitalized and coloured while the rest of the word appears in black—a pattern repeated throughout to highlight each letter.

On the following page, “Ball” hovers over an alarmed looking mouse. The word “Catch” appears next, as the mouse gets thumped in the belly by the ball. Readers will chuckle when they find out who the ball belongs to. “Dog” says the fourth page, depicting a snout poking through a mouse hole.

From there, a mad chase ensues. Mouse hightails it with a scruffy yellow dog close behind. Mouse and Dog tear through the house, turning everything upside down, while the text bounces between perspectives, like the ball, alternating between the two viewpoints.

All ends well when Mouse cleverly offers Dog a gift: his own orange ball, gift-wrapped for extra laughs. Suddenly on friendly terms, this unlikely pair finishes the story as it began. “Zzzzzzz” reads the closing page; Dog and Mouse doze off side by side, capping the story—and the alphabet—with a nap.

  •  

    Look at the cover of this book and predict what it is going to be about.

  •  The mouse came up with a creative strategy for working things out with the dog. What would other strategies be? Choose a partner, create a skit and act it out in front of the class.
  •  Browse a few alphabet books. What do they have in common? What can you expect when you read an alphabet book? Start an anchor chart on alphabet books.
  •  Choose other animals and make your own ABC book. Use this book as a mentor text to help guide you.
  •  

    Look at the book cover and make predictions about the story.

  •  

    As you read, try to predict what the next word could be. As you discover the word chosen by the author, determine what grammar the author used (imperative verbs, adjectives, nouns, one word sentences, etc.).

  •  

    Tell the story by extending the sentences for each alphabet word.

  •  

    In pairs, create a new alphabet story in the same style and produce it in a slide show.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Citizenship and Community Life