Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Ocean Animals From Head to Tail

Roderick, Stacey (Author)
Moriya, Kwanchai (Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2016. 36 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9781771383455 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 591.77
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“What ocean animal …?” This brief, non-fiction picture book encourages guessing and hypotheses, while offering basic facts about a wide variety of sea creatures: “What ocean animal has a tail like this?”

Visual hints are provided through close-up illustrations. Subsequent spreads show the entire animal in its habitat, with a brief explanation of characteristic features: “A sea horse! Most fish use their tails for swimming and steering, but a seahorse uses its tail to get a grip! This small fish is not a strong swimmer.”

Written in clear language, the book offers definitions for potentially unfamiliar words: “The squid’s eyes are built for searching for prey (animals it eats) and watching out for predators (animals that eat it) in the deepest, darkest parts of the ocean.”

Paper cut-out techniques offer a subtle depth to images that depict the vibrant colour and swirling movement of ocean life. The vermilion green of a moray eel twists around the oranges and pinks of its reef home. The venomous sea anemone reaches its tentacles through turquoise waters. A final illustrated spread offers facts about additional sea creatures; readers might like to create their own hints, with words and images.

  •  

    List the ocean animals you know. Add details that make them unique and interesting.

  •  Categorize the sea creatures: birds, fish, mammals, insects, reptiles.
  •  

    Think of additional sea creatures and create your own questions and answers. Draw the matching illustrations. Compile your work into a class book.

  •  

    Choose one of the featured animals that you want to know more about. Use a student-friendly site and do some research. Create a concept map that highlights your learning.

  •  

    In teams, create an alphabox of ocean animals you know. As a class, compare your lists. Discuss what details make each one unique and interesting.

  •  

    As you read, look for the names of the body parts of ocean animals. Create an information poster with these words.

  •  

    Choose a sea creature with an interesting feature. Create a card-style format with the question and a close-up picture of the photo on top and the answer inside. Add a few informative sentences to the answer part. Display the cards in the class or in the hall for others to guess the ocean creature.

  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology