Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

No Monkeys, No Chocolate

Stewart, Melissa (Author)
Young, Allen (Author)
Wong, Nicole (Illustrator)
Charlesbridge 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781580892872 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 633
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

point of view, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Two bookworms provide lively commentary in this non-fiction story about chocolate’s main ingredient. Working backward from harvest and production, sections such as “Cocoa pods can’t form without cocoa flowers. . .” trace the stages of growth, while others show creature contributions to the cocoa plant’s success.

Young readers will enjoy the expository text of the main storyline “. . . tender, new leaves on a cocoa tree, the little insects race to reach them” as much as the humorous asides of two inquisitive bookworms: “Brain-eating maggots? That’s disgusting!” Readers can speculate on the monkeys of the title, and their role in this complex system.

Clear, delicate illustrations convey facts in an editorial style that suits the story structure. Peel-back corners show the cartoon worms in every spread, including the cover. While the focus is on the cocoa tree, this book can be used as an overview of plant reproduction, growth, nourishment and the interdependence of natural ecosystems.

Back material includes additional information about cocoa, the rain forest and its conservation, and an author’s note.

  •  

    Before reading, examine the front cover of the book and predict what role a monkey might have in the production of chocolate.

  •  Complete a graphic organizer to show all the animals and insects that help the cocoa trees survive.
  •  Make a list of all the things you can make with chocolate. Create a menu for a meal that is full of chocolate. Would this be healthy? Why or why not?
  •  

    Create an advertisement for an imaginary chocolate bar. Choose a suitable name for it.

  •  Read the front and inside covers of the book and predict what the story will be about.
  •  

    Talk about the book. What is a bookworm? Why are the two bookworms in the story? Can you do some of the things in the section “What you can do to help?” Why or why not?

  •  Make a KWL chart about chocolate.
  •  Make a graphic organizer to show all the animals and insects that help the cocoa trees survive.
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology