Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

My Friend Rabbit

Rohmann, Eric (Author/Illustrator)
Macmillan 2007. 32 pages
First published: 2002
ISBN: 9780312367527 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character

Award

Caldecott Medal – 2003

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Friendship is at the heart of this book about Mouse and his well-meaning but mischievous friend Rabbit.

After getting Mouse’s toy plane stuck in a tree, Rabbit enthusiastically claims, “Not to worry, Mouse. I’ve got an idea!” He recruits the neighbourhood animals and stacks them, one atop the other, so that he can rescue the plane. The plan quickly goes awry and Mouse is faced with the dilemma of whether or not to remain loyal to his friend.

The story is told with few words, placing emphasis on the bold, bright illustrations. Strong black lines help the cartoon characters pop from the page, in sharp contrast to the vivid blue of the sky. Loopy dotted lines outline the plane’s flight path. The animals’ facial expressions show their initial amusement and subsequent frustration with Rabbit.

Mouse and Rabbit do have fun together, even if at times things get a bit out of hand. Their friendship shines throughout, though the ending suggests there is definitely more trouble ahead, when Rabbit once again pipes up, “I’ve got an idea!”

  •  

    Describe and discuss the action found on the cover, title and dedication pages. Make predictions about the story.

  •  

    Notice the facial expressions of the characters. Practise imitating these expressions and decide what the character could be thinking in that moment.

  •  

    The story ends as it begins, with “I’ve got an idea.” Using pictures, words or both, write a sequel to this story.

  •  

    Discuss what it means to be a good friend. Make connections with Rabbit, Mouse and your own experiences.

  •  

    Describe and discuss the action found on the cover, title and dedication pages. Make predictions about the story.

  •  

    Learn the animal names and related action words. Play guessing games to practise them orally. Match pictures and word labels.

  •  

    Retell the story, using the illustrations to guide you.

  •  

    Imitate these expressions and decide what the character could be thinking or feeling in that moment.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Drama
  • Ethics and Religious Culture