Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection Volume 1

Nicholson, Hope (Editor)
AH Comics 2016. 176 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9780987715258 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Graphic Text

Text Elements:

characterization, conflict, layout, multimodal, panel arrangement

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Ancient supernatural beings, nomadic space explorers, shamans, storytellers and ordinary mortals populate short-story comics that are vividly illustrated in a variety of artwork styles.

A brief introduction for each of the 14 stories offers context, origins and inspiration. “Coyote and the Pebbles” by Dayton Edmonds (Caddo Nation) explains the star-scattered heavens, with a lesson in acceptance (“You did not ask to draw portraits. You asked only for more light, and now you have it”), while detailed illustrations beautifully depict animal/human personas found in so many Indigenous tales. Raven is shown as both a glossy bird and a black-robed woman with feathers in her hair. In his human form, white face-paint mimics the markings around Coyote’s snout.

In contrast, illustrations for the chilling story “The Qallupiluk: Forgiven” by Sean and Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley (Scottish-Mohawk and Inuit, respectively) depict a supernatural being known for its formlessness, with air-brush effect images of spooky silhouettes—as if glimpsed through mist and the cold light of the moon.

The variety of visual expression reflects the great range of stories, from the wordless tale, “The Observing” by Elizabeth LaPensée (Anishinaabe, Métis, Irish) through the traditional portrayal of “First Hunt” by Jay and Joel Odjick (Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg) to the high-tech, future-vision of a Muskcogee Creek story, “Ue-Pucase: Water Master” by Arigon Starr (Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma), and many more. Back material includes a sketchbook section that shows illustrations in progress, and 30 brief biographies of the contributing writers and artists.

  •  

    Read and discuss the foreword and introduction to individual stories prior to reading them. Practise reading graphic texts, specifically the different ways artists use panels, frames and transitions to tell their stories.

  •  

    In small response discussion groups, discuss what you noticed about the story, what it might mean, and how the idea connects to the overall message.

  •  

    In a reader-writer’s notebook, write a series of quickwrites to prepare for future responses to literature.

  •  

    Before reading, skim through the book, paying particular attention to the different artistic styles and titles. With a partner, discuss what you think each story will be about.

  •  

    As you read, pay attention to the artwork and how it relates to the text.

  •  With a partner or in a small group, write and illustrate a “pourquoi tale” that explains why something is the way it is.
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Social Sciences
  • Visual Arts