Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Monday, Wednesday, and Every Other Weekend

Stanton, Karen (Author/Illustrator)
Macmillan 2014. 36 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9781250034892 (hardcover)
9781466865402 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Henry Cooper and his dog Pomegranate move around a lot. “Mondays, Wednesdays and every other weekend”, they live with Henry’s mother, while “Tuesdays, Thursdays and every other weekend” are spent with Henry’s father. Henry’s two homes are only two and a half blocks away, and each one has its advantages—Mama’s apartment building is full of friendly neighbours and delicious smells, while at Papa’s they can sing and play the piano. But Pomegranate can’t chase squirrels in the apartment and can’t dig holes at the house so the little dog, homesick in both of his homes, runs away. Papa, Mama and Henry all join in the search, eventually finding Pomegranate at the family’s old house. There, they make new friends, but Pomegranate learns that home is with the people who love you.

The illustrations are incredibly colourful and ornately detailed, making Henry’s world bright and lovely. The varied patterns and the use of collage elements, such as newsprint or stamping, add texture and stimulate visual discovery. Painted in reds, greens and every hue in between, the drawings show Henry and Pomegranate dancing with his mother under an elaborate, Asian-themed mobile, in their sunny and flowery neighbourhood, or in the boy’s fanciful, eye-popping bedrooms. Printed in a playful font, the text wraps around the main elements of the full-page illustrations, even leaping and looping “across the park, and around the corner.”

  •  Take a picture walk and try to decipher how the story unfolds.
  •  

    Using a graphic organizer, compare Henry’s life at his father’s house and his mother’s apartment. Does the author favour one over the other? How does she avoid showing favour?

  •  

    As a group, summarize the story and discuss the big idea that the author wants to convey.

  •  

    Look closely at the different elements that are used in the artwork. Make a list of what you see and compare it to the artist’s list found on one of the opening pages.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk and discuss the characters, setting and illustrations. Make predictions about the story.

  •  

    As the story is read aloud, compare it to your predictions.

  •  

    Discuss what it’s like to alternate between homes. Are there advantages and disadvantages to different schedules? Which do you prefer and why? In your reader-writer’s notebook, note how you relate to Henry and Pomegranate.

  •  

    In small teams, list the elements that were well thought-out for Henri and Pomegranate. What other elements do you think should be considered?

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Ethics and Religious Culture