Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Me and You

Côté, Geneviève (Author/Illustrator)
Kids Can Press 2009. 32 pages
First published: 2009
ISBN: 9781554534463 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Young children will recognize Rabbit’s and Pig’s wish to absorb the qualities of a beloved friend: “I would love to be bright pink,” says Rabbit; “My ears would be long and floppy,” says Pig. With one simple sentence per page, the language develops on the differing characteristics of the two friends, as they costume themselves to be more like each other. “I would be daring and loud! I would be dainty as a cloud!” There is the opportunity for children to identify admirable qualities in their own best friends.

Sketchy illustrations use rough-textured line and smudged colour effects to create sweet and artistic images. In one spread, rabbit—ears made small under a pair of socks—looks concerned as Pig—feet made long by clownish shoes—trips into a mud puddle. Splatters and brush strokes make mud fly: “oops! oof!”

Once successfully transformed, both friends realize: “I like it better when you are you!” The final spread shows them, heads together, paw and trotter clasped. Pig’s short ear has slipped from the dangling tights; a curly lemon peel clings to Rabbit’s fuzzy tail; their true colours emerge from under the paint: “That’s why we love each other, me and you!”

  •  

    Discuss the importance of titles. What can you infer from the title and cover? After reading, do you think “Me and You” is a good title for this story? Can you think of an alternative title?

  •  

    Think of a friend that you admire. Draw his or her portrait and add a list of the qualities that you appreciate (kind, helpful, friendly, etc.). Give it to your friend.

  •  

    Discuss the big idea embedded in the story. What did rabbit and pig learn about themselves? About one another? Why is it important to accept each other’s differences? 

  •  Read along and act out the story with the class. 
  •  

    Make a class list of adjectives from the story that describe physical characteristics and qualities. Add some adjectives of your own. 

  •  

    Describe yourself to a partner. Use the class list to help you (see above). Make comparisons where possible. For example, I am taller than you; I am the tallest in the class.

  •  

    Make a mini-book, using the story as a model. 

  • To construct his/her identity
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Physical Education and Health