Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Making It Right: Building Peace, Settling Conflict

Peters, Marilee (Author)
Annick Press 2016. 134 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9781554518098 (paperback)
9781554518104 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 364.6
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

conflict, layout, multimodal, setting, stance

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This highly readable non-fiction book discusses problems and gaps in the application of justice through our present legal system, while conveying examples of restorative justice—in Canada and around the world.

The books seven chapters include “Justice 101,” “Young and in Trouble,” “On the Road to Reconciliation and “Creating Hope for the Future.” Conversational language offers hypothetical situations that place readers in the thick of the story: “Next, the case goes to the prosecutor—a government lawyer whose job is to prove in court that you and your friends are guilty and deserve to be punished.”

Snappy headlines (“How to Say Sorry … & Mean It”) lead brief sections of text. Frequent sidebars offer additional facts and stories. An abundance of examples feature real-life young people—as victims, perpetrators and restorative justice activists: Daniel records survivor accounts in Gulu District, Northern Uganda, in the aftermath of attacks by the Lord’s Resistance Army; from Elmira, Ontario, Russ grows up to become a restorative justice mediator, after his own experience as a troubled youth: “If I had gone to jail, I know I’d have come out a much worse person. I’d feel worthless and as though the world was against me.”

Stylish illustrations recall woodblock printing effects in their high-contrast use of form and colour. These provide visuals for pull-quotes, graph data and spot illustrations for editorial concepts. A glossary, index and extensive list of sources complete this thoughtful and engaging book.

  •  

    Read and discuss the introductory chapter. Explore the meaning of restorative justice.

  •  

    In a small group, select a form of state justice and consider its advantages and disadvantages. Reflect on who benefits and who might not.

  •  

    Use information from this text and others, along with a production process, to create a multimodal presentation that offers information on one aspect or idea related to restorative justice.

  •  With a partner, think of and write down several ways to resolve a conflict without using violence, force or punishment. The conflict may be personal, cultural, domestic or international. Then find another group of two and compare answers. Discuss the differences and similarities in your responses.
  •  As you read, pay attention to the pull-quotes and sidebars. How do they connect to the text you’re reading?
  •  With a partner, create a poster about peace and conflict resolution. Include images and text and refer to three cases from the book.
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Social Sciences