Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

M Is for Melody: A Music Alphabet

Wargin, Kathy-jo (Author)
Larson, Katherine (Illustrator)
Sleeping Bear Press 2005. 40 pages
First published: 2004
ISBN: 9781585363322 (paperback)
9781585362158 (hardcover)
9781627535229 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 780
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A brief rhyme introduces each letter’s theme in this alphabet book. “H is for Harmony. It sounds very fine/when two or more notes/are played at the same time.”

Sidebars expand on the themes in clear conversational language: “Chords are read vertically, which means up and down, because the notes are ‘stacked’ on top of each other.” Confident readers will learn about different orchestral instruments, music through the ages, music notation basics, and more.

Realistic illustrations in paint, crayon and watercolour effects fill pages with evocative images. “T is for Tempo” shows a bar of musical notes, running like a track. A rabbit races ahead under a speedy scripted “Presto.” A tortoise trudges behind; the block letters of “Largo” seem to weigh heavy on his back. U and V (Unison and Voice) depict an opera company on stage—every mouth opened in song.

In both words and images, this book offers children an enticing peek into the rich world of music. A quiz at the back encourages readers to test their new knowledge.

  •  

    In a sentence or two, summarize the information about each letter. Write two or three additional facts for each letter. 

  •  

    Research and write two paragraphs about an instrument that is not listed in the book. Research how orchestras are organized.

  •  

    Listen to different types of music and instruments. Draw or write how the music makes you feel.

  •  

    Name orchestras or musical groups playing in your town or city. Bring in the advertisement, newspaper clipping or printout announcing the venue. Which musical group would you like to see in concert? With a peer, discuss the reasons why you like this group.

  •  

    As the story is read aloud, predict the music-related words for each upcoming letter. Imagine what the illustrations will be. 

  •  

    In small groups, pick one of the alphabet letters and words (F is for folksong, R is for ragtime). Find a melody of that type and present it along with one fact about the time period or place of origin. Explain a few specific words related to the topic.

  •  

    Choral read the short rhymes that accompany the pictures.

  •  

    Produce your own class alphabet book using titles or words from songs you have learned at school in ESL.

  •  

    Formulate questions based on the information found in the text. Play a class guessing game (e.g. What do you sing to put a baby to sleep? What is the word for everybody singing together?) 

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Music