Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Little Pea

Corace, Jen (Illustrator)
Chronicle Books 2005. 36 pages
First published: 2005
ISBN: 9780811846585 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, dialogue, point of view, recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Little Pea is a “happy little guy” who lives with Mama and Papa Pea, and hangs out at the park with his "pea pals". Generally, he likes his life, except for one thing. If Little Pea doesn’t eat all his candy, he won’t get any vegetables for dessert.

This clever narrative employs spare text and simple ink-and-watercolour illustrations of a wee, green pea with a red smile, set on white pages to deliver its playful perspective on eating healthily.

Children will recognize the reversal of a familiar suppertime refrain: "If you want to grow up to be a big strong pea, you have to eat your candy". Readers will also enjoy the irony of the endearing protagonist having to choke down five whole pieces of candy, food he hates, before getting to his favourite—spinach! “One. Yuck./ Two. Blech.” Some readers might catch the final pun about “living hap-pea-ly ever after.”

The deceptively simple books is a wonderful example of the humour created by the interplay of an unexpected narrative accompanying straightforward illustrations.

  •  

    Talk about the story. What do you notice about what Little Pea’s parents encourage him to eat and what your parents encourage you to eat?

  •  Use a graphic organizer to write and/or draw the differences and similarities between your life and Little Pea’s life.
  •  Identify the five food groups and create a healthy class lunch menu (including all the food groups) that everyone in the class could enjoy.
  •  

    Think of all the foods you know. Classify the food into the different food groups. Which are healthy? Which are unhealthy? Why is it important to eat healthy food?

  •  

    Identify key elements from the story. Who are the characters? Where does it take place? What does Little Pea enjoy? What is Little Pea’s problem? How is the problem unusual?

  •  

    Compare yourself to Little Pea using a graphic organizer (T-chart). What does Little Pea like and dislike? What do you like and dislike? How are you similar to Little Pea? How are you different?

  •  Create a word wall chart to include vocabulary from the story.
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Drama
  • Physical Education and Health